Canadian Hiking Trails and the Historic Kettle Valley Railway, Myra Canyon Trestles – Rebuilt

For more Myra Canyon – Kettle Valley Trestle Information – click here. We joined the hundreds of people hiking along the KVR Aug. 24 2008. When driving into the parking lot located 9 km up the Myra Canyon Forest Service Road, I was surprised to see that there was very few spaces left to park. […]

Written By Clayton Kessler

On August 24, 2008
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For more Myra Canyon – Kettle Valley Trestle Information – click here.

We joined the hundreds of people hiking along the KVR Aug. 24 2008. When driving into the parking lot located 9 km up the Myra Canyon Forest Service Road, I was surprised to see that there was very few spaces left to park. I got lucky though, after continuing on towards the trail head, I was able to park in a spot next to the gate and information gazebo.

The tunnels were very refreshing. A wind tunnel is created and in the long tunnel the wind can roar through quite forcefully!

The rock left behind for a barrier that protects the trail from falling rock above, has become quite popular for building inuksuit. Upon our return trip, 2 or 3 children were kneeling and each was creating his own new inukshuk – to tell you that they have been there.

The number of cyclists and bikers along the trail is amazing! But where there was room for a locomotive – there is room for bikers and hikers. Every time I moved over to edge to walk on the trestles to let the bikers ride on the smooth boards that run down the center of the trestles, the biker would almost always say “thank you”.

My son Zack, took a different approach. ( My wife and I walked while two of my teenage sons biked) He liked the weird looks that hikers gave him when he went riding by them on the non-boarded section with a bounce in his tire for each reailroad ty and for every bounce he let his voice go ah – just like driving over washboards when the bounce breaks a steady hum.

For more Myra Canyon Kettle Valley Railway Trestle information see www.tracksandtrails.ca

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