Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations – Part 5

Mountain Pine Beetle More than 40 percent of the recreation sites and trails have been impacted by mountain pine beetle. Dead and dying trees on recreation sites and trails presents a significant public safety hazards due to potential tree failure and windfall. In 2008 and 2009, the Federal Mountain Pine Beetle Program provided $1.435 M […]

Written By Clayton Kessler

On September 27, 2012
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Mountain Pine Beetle

Free CampingMore than 40 percent of the recreation sites and trails have been impacted by mountain pine beetle. Dead and dying trees on recreation sites and trails presents a significant public safety hazards due to potential tree failure and windfall. In 2008 and 2009, the Federal Mountain Pine Beetle Program provided $1.435 M over the 2 year period to assist with the removal of hazard trees and fuel accumulation from impacted 200 recreation sites and trails. In 2008, 2009 and 2010, the Community Development Trust, Job Opportunities

Program assisted in mitigating impact of mountain pine beetle at recreation sites and trails. The beetle infestation continues to spread and field reconnaissance indicates that additional long term treatments are required to address public safety issues at recreation sites and trails.

Marketing Recreation Sites and Trails

Free Camping

Idaho Lake

Recreation Sites are an important part of the Province’s tourism infrastructure and play a key role in government’s goal of doubling tourism revenue by 2015. Recreation Sites and Trails are critical to growing the domestic tourism sector.

A Market Development Plan for Recreation Sites was developed in 2008. The name “Recreation Sites and Trails BC” was officially branded by the Province’s Public Affairs Bureau. Marketing products such as a new website, upgrades to the interactive web map, Facebook, display material, maps, and rack cards were produced in 2009 with funding from the BC 150 Legacy Fund.

The interactive map on the Ministry website assists the public in locating recreation sites and determining the facilities at each site (e.g., number of campsites, boat launches and other facilities). Information on trails is expected to be added before May 2011.

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Made In Canada

TracksAndTrails.ca Fire Strikers and Fatwood tinder are Made In Canada

How To Light A Fire Without Matches

Step 1.

Fluff the fatwood by scraping the stick with the edge of your striker. If a hunting knife is available, use the BACK of the blade to fluff.

Step 2.

Practice getting a spark to land on the pile of fluffed fatwood by using your ferro rod and the edge of your striker.

Step 3.

Direct the sparks to the top of the pile of fluffed fatwood by using your QUICK-FIRE and the edge of the Striker. (Or use the back of a blade)