Kelowna Camping

Kelowna Camping is at a premium and this post is a response to the hundreds of emails and phone calls that I get every summer in regards to Kelowna Campgrounds. Step #1 Check the Provincial Park listings to see if something can be reserved. Even if you do not reserve, this is good process to […]

Written By Clayton Kessler

On April 27, 2009
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Kelowna Camping is at a premium and this post is a response to the hundreds of emails and phone calls that I get every summer in regards to Kelowna Campgrounds.

Step #1
Check the Provincial Park listings to see if something can be reserved. Even if you do not reserve, this is good process to get campground information.

The main reservation site for British Columbia Provincial Parks is http://www.discovercamping.ca/ and if you prefer, the phone number is:
604-689-9025 (Vancouver) 1-800-689-9025 (Int’l and the rest of British Columbia)
Pro’s and Con’s of Provincial Parks

Pro’s of Provincial Parks:
BC Provincial Parks will almost always be safe, consistent and placed in the best Vista’s. You can almost always count on the best camp possible by staying in Provincial Parks. Usually the bathrooms are very good and well stocked with toilet paper and hot water.

Con’s of Provincial Parks
They cost money.
Sometimes they are just too commercialised or maybe not enough commercialised for some.
You can’t blow up stuff like fireworks. You can’t shoot guns. ummm definite no – no firewood – you can’t cut down dead trees (you will get put in jail if you cut down green -that is “alive” -trees) and you are not supposed to even forage for firewood you have to purchase it by the bundle. (about $6 an armload)

Which Provincial Parks are closest to Kelowna?

When you are checking to see if anything is available in a provincial park for camping reservations and if you want to be near Kelowna this is the order by proximity that I would check in:

  • Bear Creek Provincial Park (West side of Okanagna Lake)
  • Fintry Provincial Park (West side of Okanagna Lake)
  • Okanagan Lake (North) (Between Summerland and Peachland)
  • Okanagan Lake (South) (Between Summerland and Peachland)
  • Kekuli Bay (close to Oyama) (East side of Okanagan Lake)
  • Ellison Provincial Park (close to vernon) (West side of Okanagna Lake)
  • Kettle River Provincial Park (45 minutes up Highway 33)

Step #2 View this list of 25 Campgrounds near Kelowna

8 Comments

  1. AndrewBoldman

    Great post! Just wanted to let you know you have a new subscriber- me!

    Reply
  2. kt

    Hey ! Do you know of any free campsites that maybe are a bit harder to get to but more secluded?
    Thanks!

    Reply
  3. Clayton

    Hi Kt. Yes, I do know of many more free secluded campsites. The topic is so huge, I will need you to narrow down the area of interest. A great resource to start getting ideas is the Backroads Mapbook. You can also check out the posts on the Free Camping link https://tracksandtrails.ca/tag/free-camping/ that you see on the left of this page.
    Once you narrow down the area of interest, leave a comment here for info.

    Sorry for not seeing your comment the first day you posted! Once your comment is approved like it is now, any new posts by you will appear immediately.
    Cheers!

    Reply
  4. Dan

    Kelowna Campgrounds looks so amazing and I think it fits on one of our RV camping trip this year. Thank you for sharing this great place to camp.

    Reply
  5. billie

    Hi Clayton my bf my stepson and i ran into you on my birthday at the old cabin in blue grouse mountain we had a blast what an amazing place!

    Reply
    • Clayton

      Hello Billie and crew!

      Hey, it was real nice meeting you the other day. Thank you so much for dropping by tracksandtrails.ca again. My friend and I explored all of Blue Hawk Mine. It was pretty cool.

      Reply

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