Forest Fire Prevention – Voluntary Request to stay out of Backcountry

The B.C. Provincial Government is asking outdoor enthusiasts to stay out of the backcountry.  I can understand this since I wouldn’t want to wake up at some backcountry camp surrounded by fire or be cut off from home due to sudden road closures.  I have been enjoying some regional trails for a day hike and such. Be sure to check out BC Wildfire information

Trout Creek Trestle on the Kettle Valley Railway along the Trans Canada Trail

Trout Creek Trestle on the Kettle Valley Railway along the Trans Canada Trail

Campfire bans are in effect anyway and that takes away from the overnight outdoor experience.  Gas fueled backpacker stoves are still ok so the kayaking trip to Wells Gray Provincial Park is still a go for me.  I will be calling the forestry department to ensure they will let us in to Clearwater Lake before we leave Kelowna though!

So stay out of the bush if you can and do not light any illegal campfires.

Here is Campfire Regulation Information:

In British Columbia, the Wildfire Act and
Regulation specifies your legal obligations
when using fire in, or within, one kilometre of
forest land or grassland.
Under the Regulation, an open fire in an
outdoor stove is a stove that uses liquid or
gaseous fuel, or briquettes. It does not include
a fire vented through a structure that has a flue
and is incorporated in a building.
In order to be considered an “open fire in an
outdoor stove,” a stove must be manufactured
for the purpose of heating or cooking. An
outdoor stove may be used unless restrictions
on their use are in effect.
A person may light, fuel or use an outdoor
stove for its intended purpose of heating or
cooking, in or within one kilometre of forest
or grassland when:
There are no bans or restrictions in place
for doing so;
Doing so is, and will continue to be, safe;
Reasonable precautions are taken to ensure
the fire is contained in the stove;
The person ensures the fire does not escape;
The person takes immediate action to carry
out fire control and report the fire if it does
escape; and
The person ensures the fire is extinguished
before leaving the area.

In British Columbia, the Wildfire Act and Regulation specifies your legal obligations when using fire in, or within, one kilometre of forest land or grassland.

Under the Regulation, an open fire in an outdoor stove is a stove that uses liquid or gaseous fuel, or briquettes. It does not include a fire vented through a structure that has a flue and is incorporated in a building. In order to be considered an “open fire in an outdoor stove,” a stove must be manufactured for the purpose of heating or cooking. An outdoor stove may be used unless restrictions on their use are in effect.

A person may light, fuel or use an outdoor stove for its intended purpose of heating or cooking, in or within one kilometre of forest or grassland when:

There are no bans or restrictions in place for doing so;

Doing so is, and will continue to be, safe;

Reasonable precautions are taken to ensure the fire is contained in the stove;

The person ensures the fire does not escape;

The person takes immediate action to carry out fire control and report the fire if it does escape; and

The person ensures the fire is extinguished before leaving the area.

About Clayton Kessler

In addition to TracksAndTrails, I am proprietor of First Page Solutions, the home of Kelowna's Digital Marketing Agency. It is the base for my team and I to build secure websites with responsive mobile design and help entrepreneurs reach top Search Engine Rankings through SEO. I live in Kelowna, let me buy you a cup of coffee and show you what I do. Just send me a text that says, "lets beat the competition on Google" to 1 (250) 470 - 8704