Category Archives: Southern Interior East

Whispering Spruce Campground near Golden BC

Whispering Spruce Campground near Golden BC is the place to make  your escape to spectacular beauty. With rocky Mountain Big Horn Sheep grazing along the embankments as you near Golden and even in the grassy meadows of the campground, this is the camping location to begin an outdoor adventure.
Outdoor adventure near Whispering Spruce Campground

Outdoor adventure near Whispering Spruce Campground

Campground Amenities:

Laundry Facilities
Playground
Sani-Dump
Convenient Store
Internet Service
Sites with: Elctric, Water and Eletric, and Water, Electric & Sewer

Different types of charges at Whispering Spruce Campground.

Tent Site: $25.00
Tent Site (w/ 15 amp electric): $30.00
*Max 4 people
*Extra person $3.00

Different types of Campsites Available.

Campsites are all filled with trees and along side South Kicking Horse River.

Website: http://www.whisperingsprucecampground.com/

Address
1430 Golden View Road
Golden
BC
V0A-1H1

Phone Number
250-344-6680

 

Swan Lake RV Resort in Vernon BC

 

Swan Lake RV Resort

With 183 total RV Sites and 60 Sites available for rental Swan Lake RV Resort is a nice way to set up camp in Veron. With accommodations for RV’s up to 45′, 30/50 amp service, back-ins, pull thrus, full hookups, restrooms, showers, Wi-Fi, cable TV, laundry, RV storage, store, clubhouse, handicap accessible, heated pool, hot tub, fitness center, horseshoes, nature watching, canoeing, boating, fishing, picnic tables, you will not be lacking in any comforts of home!

Guests pay for rental of RV Sites, Laundry, Wi-Fi, Ice and Goods purchased.

Different types of Campsites Available.

Located on Swan Lake in Vernon BC just off Hwy 97. There are RV Sites for rent that you back into and some pull-thru sites available and a small access to the lake where you could put a canoe or kayak into the lake.

Swan Lake RV Resort

 

http://www.swanlakervresort.com

 

slcorvresortltd@shaw.ca

 

8000 Highland Road
Vernon
British Columbia
V1B 3W5

 

778-475-6119

 

Summit Lake in Rocky Mountain

Summit Lake in Rocky Mountain  recreation site has no campsite but you can go to the site with a two wheel drive! Enjoy marvelous Camping and attractive Fishing opportunities.

Amenities: Boat Launch, Tables,Toilets

Free Camping

Summit Lake, Rocky Mountain, Golden

 

Free Camping

Summit Lake, Rocky Mountain, Golden

Site Description:Summit Lake in Rocky Mountain  is a small lake with rough road access. A one unit campsite is located past the beaver pond and is accesible by four wheel drive high clearance vehicles only.

Driving Directions: Drive along the main Spillimacheen Forest Service Road to teh 17 km mark and  stay right travelling the North Fork FS Road to the 21 km mark. From here turn left onto the Summit Road . After about 7 km the road reaches a creek and beaver pond. You may choose to park here and walk to the lake.

Summit Lake in Rocky Mountain Interactive Map

Nude or Prude - Halfway Hotsprings near Nakusp.

After crossing the Arrow Lakes on the Galena Bay Ferry, for free, travel towards the village of Nakusp along Highway 6 until you reach Halfway Creek which just happens to be half the way to Nakusp from Galena Bay.  Find a place to park along the FSR and grab your snowshoes and be prepared for a 11 km hike to Halfway Hotsprings.  Of course if you choose to go in summer you can drive right to the Hot Springs. View December 2012 Halfway Hotsprings pictures. (looks much more different in the snow.)

Nude or Prude

Galena Bay Free Ferry Ride

Halfway Creek is rather dry in the winter which makes it perfect for enjoying the Hot Springs

Hot water for the Hot Springs

Haphazard Hot Springs infrastructure

Infrastructure Pool of water

more Halfway pools

halfway outhouse

 

Halfway Hotsprings

Mt. Severide Trek in the Monashee Alpine

Fall Season = Hiking Season! While I was working Saturday and enjoying the local regional parks on Sunday, Jesse and crew were out bagging Alpine Peaks. Below are Mount Severide pictures and pictures from the hike up. Jesse doesn’t use a GPS, he downloaded and studied all the map sheets from Google and took them with him. Good thing, a french hiking crew who were otherwise quite prepared for the backcountry, did not have proper maps to get the correct information to Twin Lakes, lucky for them Jesse had been there several years ago so told them how to get there and gave him the printed map sheets as well (he was on his way back)!

Jesse’s trip report on another Monashee trip has a link to the Trail Head map and a track on Google maps of some of the area.

Mount Revelstoke National Park in the Selkirks

With spring here it is time to think about penciling in some backpacking vacation time into the Calendar. Soon I will have my schedule posted here so individuals can email me the dates in which they may be able to join us on. I made an inquiry about Mount Revelstoke hiking and camping by emailed one of the national park employees for the area and he kindly emailed back with the following;

Eva Lake is great place to take a group camping on Mount Revelstoke. There are about five tentpads, a small cabin, an outhouse and a bearpole. There’s a paved road to the top of the mountain so you can start hiking in the meadows. Since you start hiking at the top of the mountain, you have already gained most of your elevation. The hike to the lake is relatively easy for fit hikers (it would be a good hike to take people who haven’t done a lot of hiking). If you are hiking at a relaxed pace, making a few stops, the hike may take about 3-3.5 hours (it’s about 2 hours at a steady pace). The best time to hike the Eva Lake trail is mid-August -September. With the big snowfall we’re getting this winter the snow may not be off the trail till August.

The wild flowers at the top of Mount Revelstoke are phenomenal — they would certainly be a highlight for those interested in that type of thing. The mountain flowers are at their peak about mid-August.

If you are staying more than a night, you could take your group on a day hike up to Jade Pass (probably about 1.5 hours from Eva Lake — some may find it steep if they aren’t fit — 360m elevation gain). Jade Pass overlooks the Jade Lakes on the other side of the pass — there is a trail down to the upper Jade Lake (maybe an hour — 335m down). There are tentpads by the upper Jade Lake as well. Unless your hiking group is very fit you probably wouldn’t take them down to Jade Lake (as you have to hike up again), but the pass is a nice destination — a nice panoramic view. Depending on how fast the snow melts you possibly may encounter steep snow patches toward the Jade Lakes Pass.

In the summer you can get updated trail reports at the Parks office in Revelstoke (250-837-7500). Also they can tell you what the Park fees are. You can also request information pamphlets that they will send to you.

If you Google Eva Lake, Jade Lake, or Miller Lake, you will find some pictures. I noticed someone has posted some vacation pictures of the areas I’ve described. Miller Lake is near Eva Lake and is another nice destination — the trail up to Jade Pass overlooks Miller Lake.

Mount Revelstoke and Glacier National Parks of Canada together represent the Columbia Mountains Natural Region within Canada’s system of national parks. The Columbia Mountain ranges (Purcells, Selkirks, Cariboos, Monashees) form the first tall mountain barrier east of the Coast Mountains. They are geologically and climatically distinct from the Canadian Rockies, found east of Glacier National Park. Mount Revelstoke National Park lies entirely within the Selkirk Range of the Columbia Mountains.

Monashee Hiking to Twin Lakes - Part 2

See part 1 with the Twin Lakes directions and more pictures here.

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Idaho Peak in Kootenay Boundary near Nakusp

Idaho Peak in Kootenay Boundary near Nakusp recreation site has no campsite you can go to the site with two wheel drive! Enjoy marvelous Camping, Hiking, Nature Study opportunities.

Amenities: Tables,Toilets

free camping

Idaho Peak in Kootenay Boundary near Nakusp

 

Site Description:Idaho Peak offers one of the most spectacular flower shows in the Kootenays. The diversity and quantity of flowers is matched only by the diversity and quantity of visitors who come to admire the flowers and take in the 360 degree view from the lookout. This is not the place to come if you are seeking solitude. Despite the number of visitors, grouse and deer still roam the area, and an occasional bear is seen. Thus, if you bring your dog, please, keep it on a leash as a matter of courtesy to other trail users and the wild life. There are 2 trails to Idaho Lookout. Both meet on the ridge for the last leg of the hike up to the summit. They are the same length, but one is less travelled. If you would like to take the less travelled trail to the lookout, park at the Alamo parking area. The flowers along this section of the trail are every bit as showy as the ones near the ridge parking lot. A picnic table near the Alamo parking area is an added convenience, not available at the ridge parking area. Trail rehabilitation efforts are under way. Please, keep to the marked trails to avoid destroying the fragile alpine vegetation that you have come to admire.

Driving Directions:At the junction of Hwy 6 and 31A in New Denver, turn east onto Hwy 31A and follow the signs to Sandon. In Sandon, cross the bridge and continue through the centre of town, stopping to pick up drinking water and anything else you may need for the trip. At the end of the street, stop and read the “Idaho Peak Information Sign”. This sign has important road information. The first 2 km of the road is wide, not too steep and well maintained by the mining companies. After this, the road narrows considerably, as it switch backs up the mountain. As you enter Wild Goose Basin, you will find a pleasant picnic site on the edge of the meadow. From here, the rest of the road is clearly visible, as it switch backs up to the 2 parking areas. The most heavily used parking area is on the ridge between Idaho Peak and Selkirk Peak. The Alamo parking area is less crowded. Perfect! Park here to avoid the crowds around the ridge parking lot or protect your vehicle’s paint job from the nicks and scratches acquired in crowded parking lots.

Idaho Peak in Kootenay Boundary near Nakusp Interactive Map

Hike above Monashee Lake

Monashee lake is a beautiful alpine lake nestled in the Monashees just past Cherryville. This hike takes you into the heart of an area known as The Pinnacles.

To reach this alpine paradise drive east of Cherryville and follow South Forks FSR off of Hwy 6. Watch out for signs posted that will direct you to the trail head. From the trail head you will hike through a cedar forest, into an alder jungle and eventually up into the alpine. In some areas the trail is difficult to follow because the area is constantly changing from rockfall and spring run-off, watching for ribbons that mark the trail should make things easier.  From Monashee lake in the later summer you can hike up to a peak between the three tallest mountains in the Pinnacles (Mt Severide, Pinnacle Peak and Pinnacle E4). From this smaller peak the view is certainly beautiful. There are two possible routes to the peak, one is easier, and one takes you on a scenic walk along a steep ridge. Just below the peak on the other side there is even a small grassy area that could be camped at, although the area must be respected because this is a delicate alpine.

For a map of the hiking routes that we took

 

Unfortunately the batteries to the camera that was brought died shortly into the trip so I only have pictures of and just after the trailhead.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evely Recreation Site on Okanagan Lake near Vernon

Camping at Evely in the Okanagan, you will enjoy 50 Campsites and be able to get there with a two wheel drive! You will enjoy nice Canoeing,  Fishing, Boating facilities, picnicking, Beach Activities, Swimming & Great Camping opportunities.

Fees:$14.00 Camping

Site Description:RV and tenting sites right on the Okanagan Lake. No potable water. Short walking trails. A small boat launch. Swimming beach. The Okanagan Lake Recreation Site was renamed the Evely Recreation Site in honour of the late Glen Evely to pay tribute to his commitment to public service. The site was chosen for its natural beauty and for its proximity to Vernon. Evely, a 12-year employee of the Forest Service,was killed in a car crash near Vernon on Nov.13, 2004. He was serving as a volunteer RCMP officer when a stolen vehicle hit the cruiser he was travelling in.

Driving Directions:Located on Westside Road past Fintry Provincial Park – approximately 34 km north of Kelowna or 49 km south of Vernon. Watch for marker signs located on Hwy 97.

Camping at Evely in Okanagan Map

Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Journey - Practise Journey Two Naramata to Osoyoos

Practise Journey Two: Naramata to Osoyoos for the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award

See Practice Journey 1- Carmi to Kelowna – and Trans Canada Trail – KVR pictures.

Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Journey – The final Trip

A dream soon became reality as we packed the vehicle that would deliver us to the start of our first journey and then follow us as safety vehicles. This was to become my first practise journey. Over the 2002-2003 season we made a total of three trips. For me, this entailed two practise journeys and my qualifying journey.

In mid March we headed out towards Naramata and regained the Kettle Valley Railway just below the snow level. We set off towards Penticton, stopping on the way to have lunch and later to visit the gravesite of Andrew McCulloch and his family. This man was greatly responsible for the planning and building of major portions of the Kettle Valley Railway. The Railway is often referred to as McCulloch’s Wonder. We spent the first night in Keledon and the second night in a Forestry camp south of Vaseux Lake and continued riding until we finished in Osoyoos. Much of the Kettle Valley Railway has been destroyed by farmers’ fields and in the last section and you must ride a paved bike trail for a considerable time.

What little of the rail bed still exists lies in farmers’ fields and is not accessible. The trip totalled about 100 kilometres in length and lasted three days.

Duke of Edinburgh’s Award - A Journey along the Historic Kettle Valley Railway

Stefan Farrow
A Journey along the
Historic Kettle Valley
Railway
Duke of Edinburgh’s Award
Young Canadians Challenge
Gold Exploration Report
***************
Dedication
“I expect to pass this way but once.
Therefore, any good thing that I can do, or
any kindness I can show my fellow creature,
let me do it now. Let me not defer it, nor
neglect it, for I shall not pass this way
again.”
To all young people who journey far or
near, I dedicate this journey.
Stefan Farrow
***************
A Dream
“It is good to have an end to journey
toward, but it is the journey that matters in
the end.”
-Ursula K. LeGuin
The Beginning
Early in the fall of 2002 my Venturer Company decided that we wanted to give ourselves the
challenge of cycling the entire Historic Kettle Valley Railway over the period of two years.
We had two reasons. We all knew of the wonderful sights and interesting things to see.
There was a great history lesson to be learned just by traveling the rail bed. Second, the trips
would provide us with a good solid physical challenge.
This dream soon became reality as we packed the vehicle that would deliver us to the start of
our first journey and then follow us as safety vehicles. This was to become my first practise
journey. Over the 2002-2003 season we made a total of three trips. For me, this entailed two
practise journeys and my qualifying journey.
Practise Journey One: Carmi to Kelowna
A month after the dream was created we were finally finished the planning for our first trip.
We started 10 kilometres past Carmi Station on a Friday morning in October and started
pedaling towards Kelowna. We spent the night in a cabin owned by Scouts Canada near the
Myra Canyon area. The second day took us through Myra Canyon and to a forestry access
road which we rode down and into Kelowna. The trip totalled approximately 90 kilometres
and lasted two days.
Practise Journey Two: Naramata to Osoyous
In mid March we headed out towards Naramata and regained the Kettle Valley Railway just
below the snow level. We set off towards Penticton, stopping on the way to have lunch and
later to visit the gravesite of Andrew McCulloch and his family. This man was greatly
responsible for the planning and building of major portions of the Kettle Valley Railway. The
Railway is often referred to as McCulloch’s Wonder. We spent the first night in Keledon and
the second night in a Forestry camp south of Vaseux Lake and continued riding until we
finished in Osoyoos. Much of the Kettle Valley Railway has been destroyed by farmers’
fields and in the last section and you must ride a paved bike trail for a considerable time.
What little of the rail bed still exists lies in farmers’ fields and is not accessible. The trip
totalled about 100 kilometres in length and lasted three days.
Preparations and Training
My practise journeys prepared me for my qualifying journey in many ways. First, and most
importantly it gave me an indication of my physical capabilities and readiness for a larger and
longer journey. While on these shorter journeys I was able to practise basic bicycle repairs
and maintenance in a situation where help was not far away. However, I believe that the
greatest learning experience was the cycling itself. I learned what pace I could maintain and
how far I could reasonably go in one day. These trips allowed me to adjust the weight of my
gear to be suitable for a longer journey and more specific to my possible needs.
I have been certified in First Aid for several years as well as taking basic wilderness survival
courses. Through many years of hiking and camping to predict possible dangers on the
exploration and to take appropriate safety precautions. This training also included learning
how to prepare an emergency action plan. I also took a Ground Search and Rescue course,
which taught me map and compass work, as well as survival techniques. Practical camping
experience has been giving me training in meal and menu planning, site selection, equipment
use and safety for many years through planning for and going camping on a regular basis.
Also, through I learned to treat the environment in a friendly way as described in the
‘Wilderness Code of Behaviour’. Overall I would say that I was very prepared for my
qualifying journey, both mentally and physically.
The Journey
And then… it began.
The Five W’s: Who, What, When, Where, Why
The final journey took place on the days and nights of the 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th of May in
the year 2003. Four youth participated in the journey. Three were part of the 10th Kelowna
Venturer Company and were participants in the award program. The fourth wasn’t an award
participant, but was a wonderful asset to our journey and we greatly appreciate his
participation. The youth that participated were:
1. Stefan Farrow (Gold Level), Age 17
2. Jason Tucker (Gold Level Pre-trip), Age 15
3. Tyler Peterson (Silver Level), Age 15
4. Joel Herron (Non-participant), Age 13
For safety we also had one adult who camped with us and routinely met up with us along the
way. While she was camping in the same area and ate our food, she did not in any way
participate in our activities. In the trip log, found later in this report, it is repeatedly
mentioned that we met up with her along the trail. She would drive ahead to predetermined
checkpoints where we would meet her and confirm that everything was still going according
to plan. As will be demonstrated in the journal this was a precaution for which we were
extremely grateful. Her name was Anne Tucker, and we are also very grateful for her help
and support. Thank YOU ANNE!
For this journey we chose to cycle a portion of the Historic Kettle Valley Railway. We started
in Merritt, British Columbia, cycled as far as the Highway 5 toll-booths, returned by vehicle
to Brodie, and then continued on to Princeton and beyond. We chose to undertake an
exploration, a purpose with a trip. Our journey’s focus was the Kettle Valley Railway and its
rich history. Permission for this exploration was requested and received from the Provincial
Award Office. We were granted permission to use a ‘moving base camp’. All the overnight
gear and base camp food was loaded into the support vehicle and met us at our camp
locations. This was authorized by Mark Crofton as it allowed us to focus on the historical
research.
We chose the Kettle Valley Railway as our focus because it is a very rich and important part
of British Columbia’s history. The railway provided a vital link to many parts of British
Columbia for many years. In many areas you can still find the remnants of water towers,
station houses, and other facilities. In many other areas however, no trace of the rail line can
be found aside from the path that is still in existence. In other areas still, there is nothing but
farmers’ fields where the rail bed should have existed. The rail bed provided a fairly easy
route to ride on but many natural obstacles created areas that were difficult to pass. I am
almost ashamed to that before we started the exploration I only knew a very small amount
about the railway and its location. I never realized that it branched so far into the interior of
British Columbia or that it drives so close to the coast. I now know these things and much,
much more.
Day One
Who said this was flat?
Day Start: 11:00
KM 0 – Patchet Road
Starting from Merritt, this is the first uninterrupted access to the rail bed, almost 19.2 KM
south of Merritt. From here to Kingsvale Station the rail bed is very rough and strewn with
large rock creating a technically difficult first day of riding. Several washouts have occurred
here and the largest one is 180 metres long. In 1994 the Coldwater River changed its course
washing away a section of the rail bed. The Nicola Valley Explorers Society has rebuilt a
single track trail and a 10 metre bridge into the hillside to bypass this washout. We took
advantage of this trail through the trees to stop in the shade and enjoy lunch.
The rail bridge at Voght Creek was removed in 2001 when Coldwater Road was realigned.
KM 9.5 – Kingsvale Station
Until this station burned to the ground in the year 2000 it was being used as a private
residence. No sign of this station exists today. After Kingsvale the rail bed right of way
enters private fields and is blocked by many locked gates. We chose to ride Coldwater Road
until we met the Coquihalla Highway.
KM 12.1 – Highway 5 Exit 256
At this point we met up with our safety vehicle for the first time since beginning that morning.
It was here that we were also able to rejoin the rail bed. We rested under the overpass for
about half an hour, where we were protected from the elements.
The next section of the rail bed was more difficult, and once again littered with many large
rocks and boulders. The idea of simply travelling along Coldwater Road, which was located
along the rail bed, was extremely tempting, but we were successful in overcoming this
temptation and stayed on the rail bed. Before long however the rail bed smoothed out once
again and we entered one of the more scenic sections of the railway. Along this section of the
railway the rail bed and the Coldwater River repeatedly switch sides of the canyon in order to
gain the easiest path up the narrow canyon. Along this section there are a total of seven
trestles which have been planked and hand railed sometime in 2001.
KM 21.7 – Brodie Station (BASE CAMP ONE)
Upon reaching the site of Brodie Station, we once again met our safety and support vehicle.
The station at Brodie no longer exists and the original trestle has been removed. All that you
can see is the concrete bases on either side of the river. From this point the railway branches.
One branch goes southeast to Princeton and the other goes southwest to Hope. We spent a
while searching for a campsite that was away from the other tourists, who where mainly noisy
quad riders. Eventually we found the perfect location, a small grassy clearing away from the
main tourist area and less than 200 meters from the rail bed.
DAY ONE: Summary
Distance Traveled: 21.7 KM
Weather: Sunny with occasional clouds, hot, and no precipitation.
Start Time: 11:00
Finish Time: 17:00
Number of Travel Hours: 6
Total Trip Distance: 21.7 KM
Day Two
There is ‘Hope’
Day Start: 09:30
KM 21.7 – Brodie Station – Base Camp
This day started on a side road for the first kilometre. This road crosses under the Coquihalla
Highway before reconnecting with the original rail bed branch toward Hope. Ominous signs
warn that the path ahead is impassable by vehicle, but we trek on having already confirmed
with the local trails society that we would be able to get our bicycles through. Along this
portion we spotted several deer ahead of us. We attempted to get close enough to take a
picture but were not successful.
KM 29.2 – Major Washout
At this point a major washout has destroyed the hillside and you must take an extremely steep
bypass trail up the hillside and around the washout. Once again we chose to stop and eat
lunch at the apex of this trail, in the cool shade. Another smaller washout follows almost
immediately, however, this one was much easier to cross.
The next portion of the journey was easy riding until the rail bed ended in a locked gate in the
eight foot high wildlife fence along the Coquihalla Highway. In order to pass you had to
detour through the bush, and traverse a small stream before passing through a one way animal
gate.
KM 31.1 – Juliet Station
The actual site of Juliet Station now rests underneath the Coquihalla Highway. The only
marker at the actual location is a small green sign that reads “Juliet Station” in the centre
highway divider.
At this point we met Anne and the support vehicle. It was decided that since Jason had
tripped during the stream crossing and ended up completely soaking his feet and most of his
legs, he would return to the base camp in the vehicle to retrieve new shoes and they would
meet up with the rest of us at the next checkpoint.
In order to regain the rail bed we had to follow the side road one kilometre and then use an
overpass to cross the highway. After crossing we used a second side road to back track to the
KVR access point. At this point a large sign explains the source of many of KVR station
names as well as Andrew McCulloch’s work. The next stretch of rail bed started with an old
and extremely rusted metal rail trestle. The KVR for the next leg of the journey has been
turned into the Coldwater River Provincial Park Road.
KM 33.5 – Detour
At this point the rail bed once again is destroyed by the highway. Further progress along the
proposed official rout was not navigable due to a double crossing of the Coldwater River. We
decided that while the first crossing was safely achievable, not knowing what the condition of
the second was, we would not risk taking that route.
Instead, we began searching for another one way animal gate to regain access to the highway.
However, after ten minutes we gave up the search, as all that we found was a section of fence
that appeared to have been recently replaced. We could only assume that the gate we were
looking for used to be there. We opted instead to rig a rope pull system and hoisted the bikes
over the fence. This was quite an ordeal and took nearly 20 minutes. However it saved us
having to back track for 30 minutes, before returning along the highway. From this point we
began a four kilometre cycle down the highway to the next access point. Part way along this
stretch the weather began to turn for the worse. A light snow began to fall and we pedaled
onward. At exit 231 we left the highway and stopped to try and locate the KVR grade.
However, within one minute of stopping the snow turned into a blizzard. We immediately
sought refuge in the highway underpass tunnel. All that we could see out both ends of the
tunnel was a solid wall of white. We took this as an opportunity to rest and we removed some
wet clothing and bundled ourselves up to keep warm. I ventured into the semi-protected area
near the entrance to attempt to gain a cell phone signal. I was able to gain a minimal signal
and immediately called Anne and explained where we were so that she knew that we were
safe and had found shelter. I told her that we would stay where we were until the white out
abated. We spent about 20 minutes in the underpass before the snow suddenly stopped. Upon
looking out the far end of the overpass we could clearly see the KVR access point. However,
we knew that the going was going to be tough because there was 1.5 centimetres of snow on
the ground. Along this stretch of rail bed we were fortunate to spot a bald eagle and its nest.
However they were both too far away to take a clear picture.
KM 41.5 – Another Detour
Once again the rail access is blocked and destroyed by the highway. Our route took us on an
alternate path south where we then crossed under the twin highway bridges at exit 228. On
the other side we were able to access the adjacent KVR Bridge and the rail bed. From here
we took an overpass over the highway and entered the Britton Creek Rest area. Here we met
up with Anne and Jason in the support vehicle and used the opportunity to use the restrooms.
Then it once again began to snow. We had to make the tough decision to end our day here
because it was simply not safe to continue as the next section of KVR was treacherous and
has no vehicle access for several hours. Also it was decided that due to the cold, cycling
back, was also not safe. It was decided that we would have to use our Emergency Action Plan
and we loaded the bicycles onto the vehicle and then we drove back to our base camp at the
Brodie Station.
DAY TWO: Summary
Distance Traveled: 19.8 KM
Weather: Hail in morning before departure. Cloudy, cool, heavy snowfall in the
afternoon.
Start Time: 09:30
Finish Time: 16:30
Number of Travel Hours: 7
Total Trip Distance: 41.5 KM
Day Three
There is Gold in dem Hills!
Day Start: 10:00
KM 41.5 – Brodie Station – Base Camp
Today we packed up the camp at Brodie and continued on. Instead of taking the fork towards
Hope we took the fork towards Princeton. The first two kilometres of rail bed contained two
washouts which, were easily navigated around. We continued to Brookmere, which was only
a mere 6.4 Kilometres away.
KM 47.9 – Brookmere Station
All that remains of Brookmere Station is the old water tower and one CPR caboose. The
small village of Brookmere contains only a small number of houses and uses the KVR right of
way as their main street. This was the day’s first checkpoint with Anne.
KM 57.1 – Thalia Station
This station, formerly named Canyon Station, no longer exists. However, several hundred
metres further down the rail bed a frame and pile trestle has burned to the ground. The trestle
is believed to have been set ablaze by the work of arsonists. This trestle is easily bypassed by
using a service road that runs alongside the KVR. This does however require an extremely
steep decent down (nearly 30 degrees) from the raised trail bed followed by an equally steep
climb on the other side.
KM 73.2 – Manning Station
The only evidence that this station ever existed is the widened right of way and some scattered
concrete pieces. The rail bed before and after Manning Station crosses Otter Creek numerous
times. This stretch is extremely straight. So straight that it gives the definite illusion of going
nowhere. We had an extremely interesting weather system passing over head along this
stretch. Before starting we were forced to take cover from the rain and hail. After that had
passed we were forced to keep up a good pace due to the fact that ahead, it was raining, and
behind, it was snowing. We were stuck in the middle and did not want to be in either.
KM 84.0 – Tulameen Station
This station has a rich history. Originally the station was called Campement des Femmes,
meaning Camp of the Women. Salish Indians used this flat expanse as a base camp and often
left their women and children here while they went on the hunt. Later the flats became known
as Otter Flats. This was originally due to its use by the white man during the Gold Rush.
Eventually, it was renamed Tulameen. Once again we met up with Anne. The original
station house was built in 1914 and now serves as a private residence. Also an old red freight
shed has been moved a short distance from the rail bed and is being used as storage shed.
Also found in Tulameen is an archway across the rail way access that reads ‘Tulameen
Gateway’.
KM 90.5 – Coalmont Station
After a long and difficult day we finally arrived in Coalmont, our destination for the day.
Coalmont is a very small community which still boasts many original buildings such as the
Saloon and Hotel. About a ten minute ride from the rail bed we found Granite Creek Forestry
Campsite. We spent the night here and met a high school outdoors education teacher who
was travelling the KVR in the opposite direction. We swapped notes with each other on the
conditions of the trail. He warned us that the next portion of the rail bed was covered in loose
shale and should be carefully negotiated.
DAY THREE: Summary
Distance Traveled: 49 KM
Weather: Partly cloudy, cool to cold, bursts of showers near 13:00. Snow spotted
in the distance behind us.
Start Time: 10:00
Finish Time: 18:30
Number of Travel Hours: 8.5
Total Trip Distance: 90.5 KM
Day Four
Are we there yet?
Start Time: 10:00
KM 90.5 – Coalmont Station & Granite City
Located just outside the Granite Creek Forestry campsite is the site of Granite City. This
name comes from Granite Creek which joins the Tulameen River in this area. In 1885 gold
was discovered in the streams and the population soon grew to about 2000 people. In 1886
Granite City was considered to be the largest city in the interior of British Columbia. Four
years later the gold boom had ended and the town became deserted. Gold panning in Granite
City was difficult because of a white metal of similar weight to gold. It was difficult to
separate from real gold. Many years later it was discovered that this faux gold was actually
platinum, with a value well exceeding that of gold. All that currently exists of Granite City
are a few remains of log buildings in the campsite and one log cabin just outside the campsite.
This cabin is being restored to its original condition. A short distance away a small cairn
holds a plaque that marks the location of Granite City.
KM 90.7 – Coalmont-Tulameen Road
We returned through town and once again regained access to the KVR rail bed.
KM 100.8 – Parr Tunnel
This tunnel is 147 metres long, and due to the curvature of the tunnel neither end is visible
when in the middle of the tunnel. Shortly past the tunnel we came to a trail pavilion which
has been built. We chose this pavilion with its wonderful view of the Tulameen River to stop
and have lunch. This section of the railroad is named after the engineer who constructed the
Parr Tunnel. Originally, two bridges took 1.5 kilometres along the south side of the Tulameen
River. However, on January 25, 1935, an ice jam washed out one of the bridges. Repairs
were not completed until February of 1935. These bridges however continued to cause
problems with respect to their maintenance. This resulted in the construction of the tunnel in
1948 and 1949 which allowed 1.3 Kilometres to be relocated to the north side of the
Tulameen River. You can still see the original rail bed on the far side of the river. According
to trustworthy sources the original ties still lie there rotting into history.
KM 108.0 – Another Tunnel
This tunnel, located just before the city of Princeton, is 324 metres long and as straight as an
arrow. Travelling through the tunnel provides the illusion that the tunnel is actually getting
longer the farther you enter. While this is obviously not true it is a very overpowering feeling.
This tunnel takes the rail bed under Highway 3 just after you cross the Tulameen River on a
96 metre metal frame rail bridge.
KM 109.4 – Princeton Station
Entering Princeton you must pass through an industrial area of town. In order to discourage
motor vehicles from using the rail bed concrete blocks, some as much as 5 feet tall, have been
placed randomly along several hundred metres of rail bed. After the straight forward ride
along the clear rail bed this was a welcome relief as we realised that we must once again
‘steer’. After passing under a gateway similar to the one in Tulameen reading “Princeton
Gateway” we found Anne waiting for us. We took about 40 minutes here to rest before
continuing on.
Originally Princeton was known as Vermillion Forks. Vermillion refers to the mercuric
sulphide compound that produces a brilliant red pigment. In 1860, Vermillion Forks was
renamed after the Prince of Wales. Hence the name Princeton. The original station can still
be found. However, it has been sided with vinyl and now is home to a real estate office and to
a Subway restaurant.
The next portion of our journey was long and arduous. We were tired and sore from the last
four days of riding and we knew that the end was only a short ways away. To make matters
worse much of this section of rail bed was covered with shale and larger sections of loose
rock making the going very tough. We found ourselves stopping to rest for five minutes after
each 10 or 12 minutes of riding. Progress was very slow.
KM 117.9 – Belfort Station
This station was named after the famous French garrison in the Jura Mountains that resisted
the German invasion of 1870. However, once again the evidence that it ever existed is only in
a widening of the right of way. This was the last time that we scheduled to meet up with
Anne before the final destination of our trip.
The next portion of the rail bed consisted of a series of three large loop backs that cover many
kilometres. The hardest part about these loops was that they were at a considerable incline.
KM 124.7 – Highway 40
As we were getting ready to cross Highway 40 I received a cell phone call from Anne. She
told us the road access to our destination, Jura Station, was completely blocked and destroyed.
After consulting our maps and guides it was decided that we would have to call an end to our
trip here as the next road access after Jura Station was nearly 10 Kilometres and we did not
feel that we would be capable of the extra uphill distance. Therefore, Anne returned to our
location on Highway 40 and we completed our journey.
DAY FOUR: Summary
Distance Traveled: 34.2 KM
Weather: Partly clear, sunny, warm, no precipitation.
Start Time: 10:00
Finish Time: 16:30
Number of Travel Hours: 6.5
Total Trip Distance: 124.7 KM
Trip Summary
An experience to never forget
Total Distance Travelled: 124.7 Kilometres
Number of Days: 4
Number of Nights: 3
Number of hours Travelling: 28
General Weather: Cloudy with sun. Snow, rain, and hail on days 2 and 3. Cold to warm.
Overall Experience: !OUT OF THIS WORLD!
While the trip was a success there are several points that must be mentioned so that any one in
the future may have an even better trip. While nothing major occurred there were a few
incidents that could have been improved upon. They are as follows.
Weather
While forecasts were gathered there was no way to properly predict the weather at such a high
altitude. As such we should have been slightly more prepared with a proper action plan for
snow and hail. Instead we found ourselves creating plans and making decisions as the snow
began to fall. While this was not detrimental to our health because we had the foresight to use
a chase vehicle, it was an issue that caused us to be unable to complete the journey on the
second day. However, it must also be mentioned that considering the gravity of the situation
the right decisions were made without a plan in a timely matter. It takes a lot of will power to
abandon the plan that you want to follow and admit that it will have to be done another time.
Personal Preparedness and Clothing
Overall everyone was prepared to a basic level both physically and mentally. However, while
Jason, Tyler, and I had each participated in other long range cycle trips, Joel had never.
While no major issues became apparent there were several points that should also be noted.
While all attempts were made to ensure that Joel knew what the trip was going to be like in
advance it was not possible for him to fully comprehend the scope and challenge of the trip
without having done a proper cycle expedition before. We assumed that the many days of
mountain biking meant that he was fully aware of what the exploration would be like. Also it
should be noted that his lack of experience in simple matters like cooking and setting up and
breaking camp meant that the rest had to work a little harder. However, Joel is definitely a
better person as a result of the experience and is better prepared for any future expeditions.
He learnt the skills in the best possible way; learning by doing.
Secondly a note should be made that more than one person was not prepared from a clothing
standpoint. On more than one occasion clothing had to be borrowed for sleeping, and for
weather dependent times such as the rain and snow. Once again this did not have any effect
on the trip or any participants, but had the potential to become a problem if the owner later
needed the same clothing. The only way that I see to avoid this in the future is to have an
extremely specific list of personal gear as opposed to assuming that we are all seasoned
campers and know what to pack.
Route Plan
While the basic route plan was very well detailed through the use of guidebooks and maps we
still encountered problems. Due to the time elapsed since the publication many roads or
portions of the KVR that we planned to use were no longer accessible and alternate plans had
to be made on the fly. Once again, this was not a critical point. However, it should be kept in
mind that much of the KVR is on private property and is subject to change in access at the
whim of the land owner. Our trip was cut short due to such changes in road access.
Other Situations
The only other situation that has not already been mentioned occurred on the third day.
Approximately 1.5 hours before we arrived in Tulameen (2.5 hours from days end) Joel
started to become cold. Upon consultation with him I determined that is was due to the
temperature and the fact that he had not eaten anything since shortly after lunch. While he
had been hungry for some time he did not ask for food from any of our stores. Upon giving
him some food and some chemical hand warmers to help re-warm him he immediately started
to improve. Within minutes he was ready to go. Later I discovered that he did not know that
I always carry enough food and rations to keep all participants alive in any situation for at
least 24 hours. This was a case of miscommunication. It must be noted that in the future all
participants must be told to never be afraid to ask for help and all must know the exact
emergency measures taken. This never turned into a true emergency situation; however, if he
had not appeared visibly cold it could have further developed into a case of hypothermia.
Logistics
Where is the Hot Chocolate?!
Yes, we did forget the Hot Chocolate. However, being thrifty Venturers we soon discovered
that hot fruit juices work just as well. This next section will describe our route plan (including
maps and diagrams), the equipment that we took, the menu, and the safety equipment
available.
Equipment
We started out with a small list of things that we needed to make the exploration a success.
However, it soon grew until it was quite large. Here is a list of the equipment that went with
us.
Group Equipment
.. 2- tents
.. 1- two burner camp stove
.. 3- tarps
.. 1- folding table
.. 2- lamps
.. 1- propane tree (for lamp and stove)
.. 1- large propane tank
.. 4- small propane tanks
.. 1- cooler chest
.. 1- large first aid kit
.. 1- set of basic cooking utensils
.. 1- small set pots and pan
.. 1- bucket of twine
.. 1- bag of assorted ropes
.. 3- small wash tubs
.. 3- water containers (filled)
.. 1- axe
.. 1- hatchet
.. 1- container with matches, and other fire lighting equipment
.. 1- set of cleaning solutions (dish soap and hand soap)
.. !FOOD!
Personal Equipment
.. sleeping bag
.. sleeping mat
.. camp pillow
.. pairs of pants
.. pairs of soccer shorts
.. 8- t-shirts
.. 8- underwear
.. 12- socks (wool, cotton, and nylon)
.. toques
.. pairs of cotton gloves
.. pair of cycling gloves
.. helmet
.. pair running shoes
.. pair hiking boats
.. whistles
.. compass
.. phones (cell and satellite)
.. spare inner-tube
.. tool kit
.. tire pump
.. rain gear (top and bottom)
.. FRS radios
.. 700ml water bottles
.. digital camera
.. notebooks
.. guide books
.. topographical maps
.. survival kit (please section that follows for details)
.. Global Positioning System Until
.. nylon belts
.. pairs sunglasses
.. axle/chain grease
.. 10- extra batteries
.. pair of extra laces
.. warm jackets
.. fleece hoodies
.. wool blanket
.. bottle of waterless hand wash solution
.. multi-purpose tool (fancy pocket knife)
.. bottle SPF 45 sunscreen
.. dishes (plate, bowl, cup)
.. lightweight carabineers
.. 25 metre buoyant rope
.. 1- high absorbent camp t
.. magnesium block an
.. space blanket
.. flare launcher (10 flares)
.. pocket knives
.. folding saw
.. whistle
.. emergency fi
.. flashlights
.. glow sticks
.. flashing red
.. 10- hot hands (hand warmers)
.. Rations (energy bars, GORP)
.. mirror
.. mini sewing kit
.. cheap lighters
weighed approximately 20 Kilograms. All safety equipment was listed in the above lists and
can easily be identified. It should be noted that with the exception of a few blisters and one
small cut no emergency equipment was required. We still used the phone to communicate our
position to Anne, but never in a true emergency fashion.
Menu
Friday Lunch
.. bun wiches (cream cheese or cold cuts)
.. juice boxes
.. apples and oranges
Friday Dinner
.. dehydrated soup (3 bean Chile soup)
.. buns
.. veggies & dip
.. milk
Saturday Breakfast
.. oatmeal
.. milk
.. oranges and apples
Saturday Lunch
.. bagels
.. cream cheese
.. cold cuts
.. apples and oranges
.. juice boxes
Saturday Dinner
.. chile
.. pepperoni
.. buns
.. milk or juice
Sunday Breakfast
.. egg McMuffins (english muffins, eggs, cheese, and beef cold cuts)
.. milk
.. oatmeal
Sunday Lunch
.. bun wiches (cream cheese or cold cuts)
.. juice Boxes
.. apples and Oranges
Sunday Dinner
.. baked beans with ham
.. mixed salad
.. milk
Monday Breakfast
.. pancakes and sausage
.. apples and oranges
.. milk
Monday Lunch
.. bagels
.. cream cheese
.. cold cuts
.. juice boxes
Staples (always available)
.. granola bars
.. juice boxes
.. water
.. juice crystals
.. cookies
Breakfast and dinner were always hot meals and the lunches were prepared in the morning so
that we could take them with us on the trail. After we left the camp each morning we were
totally self contained until we arrived at camp again that evening.
Maps
The next several pages contain maps which clearly show our route and all major points of
interest. Please refer to the kilometre markings which correspond to the exploration log.
Day One
Start
KM 9.5
KM 21.7—Base
Camp Day 1 and 2
Day Two
KM 21.7 Base
Camp Day 1 and 2
KM 31.1
KM 41.5 DAY END
Days Three and Four
Base Camp
Day 1 and 2
KM 47.9
KM 57.1
KM 73.2
KM 84.0
KM 90.5
Base Camp Day 3
KM 100.8
KM 109.4
KM 117.9
KM 124.7
Journey End
History
Let us not forget
This history of the Kettle Valley Railway is too vast to include in any one book. However, I
will attempt to summarise the most important portions in this report. The KVR’s history is a
rich story with many twists and turns, both financially and physically.
The railway was conceived in the late 1880s as a route to allow the mines of the Kootenay
District of Southern British Columbia access to the coast and Vancouver. The railway
became a struggle of personalities, politics, finance and geography. More than six
governments rose and fell over the issues surrounding the building of this railway. More than
100 workers died in the construction and operations of the railway. However, as remarkable
as it is, no passenger ever died on the KVR.
The railway was nicknamed, McCulloch’s Wonder, after the railway’s chief engineer,
Andrew McCulloch. He built this astonishing railway crosses three mountain ranges and
some of the most rugged canyons on this planet. Many people have called the KVR the most
difficult and expensive railway ever built.
The railway starts in the once small town of Hope, 90 miles east of Vancouver. The railway
chose to take the most daring and treacherous path, one that no previous group had taken.
While all other roads and rail lines had chosen to travel north, around the mountain ranges,
before continuing east, the KVR chose to go straight through the heart of the mountains.
While construction started in 1910, it was only 20% complete in 1912 due to the lack of
workers, rail ties and other equipment.
Part of the reason for the slow progress was the extremely difficult terrain that the railway was
forced to cross. In the mountains above Kelowna, in what is now called Myra Canyon,
McCulloch encountered an obstacle even he was taken aback by. “Never saw a railway built
on any such hillside as this! Cannot even guess the cost now.” he wrote in his diary. This task
was so great that in a stretch of only 5.5 miles they were forced to build 18 wooden trestles
and two tunnels as well as numerous retaining walls.
Many legal battles ensued between the KVR and other rail companies for the right of way
through the Coquihalla pass as all were attempting to build similar railroads. After a long
period of brutal construction in the Coquihalla pass the last spike was finally driven in on July
31, 1916. At last the line was complete and officially declared open. The railway had cost a
grievous amount of money to build and through the entire life of the KVR the debts racked up
were never repaid.
Throughout the history of the operation of the KVR many things changed. New stations were
created, and old ones decommissioned. New services were created and disappeared before
the public even knew about them. However, while they never paid off their debts, the rail line
was extremely successful. The last passenger train ran in January 1964 and the final freight
train arrived in Spences Bridge on May 12, 1989. Just over a year later, on June 21, 1990, the
National Transportation Agency authorized Canadian Pacific to abandon the railway, and
during 1991 all track, with the exception of seven miles of track near Summerland saved for a
tourist railway operation, was removed. The Kettle Valley Railway became a part of history.
Andrew McCulloch won the appreciation of the KVR’s passengers through his use of
Shakespearean names for his stations. These names, such as Romeo, Juliet, Othello, and Lear,
created a sense of familiarity with the passengers on the trains and allowed to them to feel at
home even when they were travelling through the most treacherous railway in the world.
It is unfortunate to note that many relics of the railway are disappearing faster than the
company itself. Only a few years ago you could still find many rail houses and other
buildings at many locations along the original path. Now only the few structures that have
been designated heritage buildings can be found. This is a true tragedy. As we found during
our exploration many bridges and stations have been burned to the ground, both in accidents
and by arsonists. Other buildings we were told still exist but have been moved many miles to
be conglomerated with other heritage buildings. In many places the only evidence that
something had once existed was the widening of the right of way or a sign stating the location
of a building.
A second note is that the KVR recently suffered a most grievous loss. During the second
firestorm of the Okanagan Mountain Park Fire, August 2003, 12 of the wooden trestles above
Kelowna were completely destroyed. All that can be found of them are some concrete anchor
pilings. Two steel trestles were also badly damaged. These trestles have long been an
important part of the heritage of Kelowna and the KVR as you could see so many in just five
miles. They are gone now and we will never be able to truly see their wonder again.

Stefan Farrow

A Journey along the Historic Kettle Valley Railway

Duke of Edinburgh’s Award

Young Canadians Challenge

Gold Exploration Report

***************
Gold Trip Photo’s (Trans Canada Trail and Kettle Valley Railway)
***************

Dedication

“I expect to pass this way but once.

Therefore, any good thing that I can do, or

any kindness I can show my fellow creature,

let me do it now. Let me not defer it, nor

neglect it, for I shall not pass this way

again.”

To all young people who journey far or

near, I dedicate this journey.

Stefan Farrow

***************

A Dream

“It is good to have an end to journey

toward, but it is the journey that matters in

the end.”

-Ursula K. LeGuin

The Beginning

Early in the fall of 2002 my Venturer Company decided that we wanted to give ourselves the challenge of cycling the entire Historic Kettle Valley Railway over the period of two years.

We had two reasons. We all knew of the wonderful sights and interesting things to see.

There was a great history lesson to be learned just by traveling the rail bed. Second, the trips would provide us with a good solid physical challenge.

This dream soon became reality as we packed the vehicle that would deliver us to the start of our first journey and then follow us as safety vehicles. This was to become my first practise journey. Over the 2002-2003 season we made a total of three trips. For me, this entailed two practise journeys and my qualifying journey.

Practise Journey One: Carmi to Kelowna – view pictures

A month after the dream was created we were finally finished the planning for our first trip.

We started 10 kilometres past Carmi Station on a Friday morning in October and started pedaling towards Kelowna. We spent the night in a cabin owned by Scouts Canada near the Myra Canyon area. The second day took us through Myra Canyon and to a forestry access road which we rode down and into Kelowna. The trip totalled approximately 90 kilometres and lasted two days.

Practise Journey Two: Naramata to Osoyous – view pictures

In mid March we headed out towards Naramata and regained the Kettle Valley Railway just below the snow level. We set off towards Penticton, stopping on the way to have lunch and later to visit the gravesite of Andrew McCulloch and his family. This man was greatly responsible for the planning and building of major portions of the Kettle Valley Railway. The Railway is often referred to as McCulloch’s Wonder. We spent the first night in Keledon and the second night in a Forestry camp south of Vaseux Lake and continued riding until we finished in Osoyoos. Much of the Kettle Valley Railway has been destroyed by farmers’ fields and in the last section and you must ride a paved bike trail for a considerable time.

What little of the rail bed still exists lies in farmers’ fields and is not accessible. The trip totalled about 100 kilometres in length and lasted three days.

Preparations and Training

My practise journeys prepared me for my qualifying journey in many ways. First, and most importantly it gave me an indication of my physical capabilities and readiness for a larger and longer journey. While on these shorter journeys I was able to practise basic bicycle repairs and maintenance in a situation where help was not far away. However, I believe that the greatest learning experience was the cycling itself. I learned what pace I could maintain and how far I could reasonably go in one day. These trips allowed me to adjust the weight of my gear to be suitable for a longer journey and more specific to my possible needs.

I have been certified in First Aid for several years as well as taking basic wilderness survival courses. Through many years of hiking and camping to predict possible dangers on the exploration and to take appropriate safety precautions. This training also included learning how to prepare an emergency action plan. I also took a Ground Search and Rescue course, which taught me map and compass work, as well as survival techniques. Practical camping experience has been giving me training in meal and menu planning, site selection, equipment use and safety for many years through planning for and going camping on a regular basis.

Also, through I learned to treat the environment in a friendly way as described in the ‘Wilderness Code of Behaviour’. Overall I would say that I was very prepared for my qualifying journey, both mentally and physically.

The Journey

And then… it began.

The Five W’s: Who, What, When, Where, Why

The final journey took place on the days and nights of the 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th of May in the year 2003. Four youth participated in the journey. Three were part of the 10th Kelowna Venturer Company and were participants in the award program. The fourth wasn’t an award participant, but was a wonderful asset to our journey and we greatly appreciate his participation. The youth that participated were:

1. Stefan Farrow (Gold Level), Age 17

2. Jason Tucker (Gold Level Pre-trip), Age 15

3. Tyler Peterson (Silver Level), Age 15

4. Joel Herron (Non-participant), Age 13

For safety we also had one adult who camped with us and routinely met up with us along the way. While she was camping in the same area and ate our food, she did not in any way participate in our activities. In the trip log, found later in this report, it is repeatedly mentioned that we met up with her along the trail. She would drive ahead to predetermined checkpoints where we would meet her and confirm that everything was still going according to plan. As will be demonstrated in the journal this was a precaution for which we were extremely grateful. Her name was Anne Tucker, and we are also very grateful for her help and support. Thank YOU ANNE!

For this journey we chose to cycle a portion of the Historic Kettle Valley Railway. We started in Merritt, British Columbia, cycled as far as the Highway 5 toll-booths, returned by vehicle to Brodie, and then continued on to Princeton and beyond. We chose to undertake an exploration, a purpose with a trip. Our journey’s focus was the Kettle Valley Railway and its rich history. Permission for this exploration was requested and received from the Provincial Award Office. We were granted permission to use a ‘moving base camp’. All the overnight gear and base camp food was loaded into the support vehicle and met us at our camp locations. This was authorized by Mark Crofton as it allowed us to focus on the historical research.

We chose the Kettle Valley Railway as our focus because it is a very rich and important part of British Columbia’s history. The railway provided a vital link to many parts of British Columbia for many years. In many areas you can still find the remnants of water towers, station houses, and other facilities. In many other areas however, no trace of the rail line can be found aside from the path that is still in existence. In other areas still, there is nothing but farmers’ fields where the rail bed should have existed. The rail bed provided a fairly easy route to ride on but many natural obstacles created areas that were difficult to pass. I am almost ashamed to that before we started the exploration I only knew a very small amount about the railway and its location. I never realized that it branched so far into the interior of British Columbia or that it drives so close to the coast. I now know these things and much, much more.

Day One

Who said this was flat?

Day Start: 11:00

KM 0 – Patchet Road

Starting from Merritt, this is the first uninterrupted access to the rail bed, almost 19.2 KM south of Merritt. From here to Kingsvale Station the rail bed is very rough and strewn with large rock creating a technically difficult first day of riding. Several washouts have occurred here and the largest one is 180 metres long. In 1994 the Coldwater River changed its course washing away a section of the rail bed. The Nicola Valley Explorers Society has rebuilt a single track trail and a 10 metre bridge into the hillside to bypass this washout. We took advantage of this trail through the trees to stop in the shade and enjoy lunch.

The rail bridge at Voght Creek was removed in 2001 when Coldwater Road was realigned.

KM 9.5 – Kingsvale Station

Until this station burned to the ground in the year 2000 it was being used as a private residence. No sign of this station exists today. After Kingsvale the rail bed right of way enters private fields and is blocked by many locked gates. We chose to ride Coldwater Road until we met the Coquihalla Highway.

KM 12.1 – Highway 5 Exit 256

At this point we met up with our safety vehicle for the first time since beginning that morning. It was here that we were also able to rejoin the rail bed. We rested under the overpass for about half an hour, where we were protected from the elements.

The next section of the rail bed was more difficult, and once again littered with many large rocks and boulders. The idea of simply travelling along Coldwater Road, which was located along the rail bed, was extremely tempting, but we were successful in overcoming this temptation and stayed on the rail bed. Before long however the rail bed smoothed out once again and we entered one of the more scenic sections of the railway. Along this section of the railway the rail bed and the Coldwater River repeatedly switch sides of the canyon in order to gain the easiest path up the narrow canyon. Along this section there are a total of seven trestles which have been planked and hand railed sometime in 2001.

KM 21.7 – Brodie Station (BASE CAMP ONE)

Upon reaching the site of Brodie Station, we once again met our safety and support vehicle.

The station at Brodie no longer exists and the original trestle has been removed. All that you can see is the concrete bases on either side of the river. From this point the railway branches. One branch goes southeast to Princeton and the other goes southwest to Hope. We spent a while searching for a campsite that was away from the other tourists, who where mainly noisy quad riders. Eventually we found the perfect location, a small grassy clearing away from the main tourist area and less than 200 meters from the rail bed.

DAY ONE: Summary

Distance Traveled: 21.7 KM

Weather: Sunny with occasional clouds, hot, and no precipitation.

Start Time: 11:00

Finish Time: 17:00

Number of Travel Hours: 6

Total Trip Distance: 21.7 KM

Day Two

There is ‘Hope’

Day Start: 09:30

KM 21.7 – Brodie Station – Base Camp

This day started on a side road for the first kilometre. This road crosses under the Coquihalla Highway before reconnecting with the original rail bed branch toward Hope. Ominous signs warn that the path ahead is impassable by vehicle, but we trek on having already confirmed with the local trails society that we would be able to get our bicycles through. Along this portion we spotted several deer ahead of us. We attempted to get close enough to take a picture but were not successful.

KM 29.2 – Major Washout

At this point a major washout has destroyed the hillside and you must take an extremely steep bypass trail up the hillside and around the washout. Once again we chose to stop and eat lunch at the apex of this trail, in the cool shade. Another smaller washout follows almost immediately, however, this one was much easier to cross.

The next portion of the journey was easy riding until the rail bed ended in a locked gate in the eight foot high wildlife fence along the Coquihalla Highway. In order to pass you had to detour through the bush, and traverse a small stream before passing through a one way animal gate.

KM 31.1 – Juliet Station

The actual site of Juliet Station now rests underneath the Coquihalla Highway. The only marker at the actual location is a small green sign that reads “Juliet Station” in the centre highway divider.

At this point we met Anne and the support vehicle. It was decided that since Jason had tripped during the stream crossing and ended up completely soaking his feet and most of his legs, he would return to the base camp in the vehicle to retrieve new shoes and they would meet up with the rest of us at the next checkpoint.

In order to regain the rail bed we had to follow the side road one kilometre and then use an overpass to cross the highway. After crossing we used a second side road to back track to the KVR access point. At this point a large sign explains the source of many of KVR station names as well as Andrew McCulloch’s work. The next stretch of rail bed started with an old and extremely rusted metal rail trestle. The KVR for the next leg of the journey has been turned into the Coldwater River Provincial Park Road.

KM 33.5 – Detour

At this point the rail bed once again is destroyed by the highway. Further progress along the proposed official rout was not navigable due to a double crossing of the Coldwater River. We decided that while the first crossing was safely achievable, not knowing what the condition of the second was, we would not risk taking that route.

Instead, we began searching for another one way animal gate to regain access to the highway. However, after ten minutes we gave up the search, as all that we found was a section of fence that appeared to have been recently replaced. We could only assume that the gate we were looking for used to be there. We opted instead to rig a rope pull system and hoisted the bikes over the fence. This was quite an ordeal and took nearly 20 minutes. However it saved us having to back track for 30 minutes, before returning along the highway. From this point we began a four kilometre cycle down the highway to the next access point. Part way along this stretch the weather began to turn for the worse. A light snow began to fall and we pedaled onward. At exit 231 we left the highway and stopped to try and locate the KVR grade.

However, within one minute of stopping the snow turned into a blizzard. We immediately sought refuge in the highway underpass tunnel. All that we could see out both ends of the tunnel was a solid wall of white. We took this as an opportunity to rest and we removed some wet clothing and bundled ourselves up to keep warm. I ventured into the semi-protected area near the entrance to attempt to gain a cell phone signal. I was able to gain a minimal signal and immediately called Anne and explained where we were so that she knew that we were safe and had found shelter. I told her that we would stay where we were until the white out abated. We spent about 20 minutes in the underpass before the snow suddenly stopped. Upon looking out the far end of the overpass we could clearly see the KVR access point. However, we knew that the going was going to be tough because there was 1.5 centimetres of snow on the ground. Along this stretch of rail bed we were fortunate to spot a bald eagle and its nest.

However they were both too far away to take a clear picture.

KM 41.5 – Another Detour

Once again the rail access is blocked and destroyed by the highway. Our route took us on an alternate path south where we then crossed under the twin highway bridges at exit 228. On the other side we were able to access the adjacent KVR Bridge and the rail bed. From here we took an overpass over the highway and entered the Britton Creek Rest area. Here we met up with Anne and Jason in the support vehicle and used the opportunity to use the restrooms.

Then it once again began to snow. We had to make the tough decision to end our day here because it was simply not safe to continue as the next section of KVR was treacherous and has no vehicle access for several hours. Also it was decided that due to the cold, cycling back, was also not safe. It was decided that we would have to use our Emergency Action Plan and we loaded the bicycles onto the vehicle and then we drove back to our base camp at the Brodie Station.

DAY TWO: Summary

Distance Traveled: 19.8 KM

Weather: Hail in morning before departure. Cloudy, cool, heavy snowfall in the afternoon.

Start Time: 09:30

Finish Time: 16:30

Number of Travel Hours: 7

Total Trip Distance: 41.5 KM

Day Three

There is Gold in dem Hills!

Day Start: 10:00

KM 41.5 – Brodie Station – Base Camp

Today we packed up the camp at Brodie and continued on. Instead of taking the fork towards Hope we took the fork towards Princeton. The first two kilometres of rail bed contained two washouts which, were easily navigated around. We continued to Brookmere, which was only a mere 6.4 Kilometres away.

KM 47.9 – Brookmere Station

All that remains of Brookmere Station is the old water tower and one CPR caboose. The small village of Brookmere contains only a small number of houses and uses the KVR right ofway as their main street. This was the day’s first checkpoint with Anne.

KM 57.1 – Thalia Station

This station, formerly named Canyon Station, no longer exists. However, several hundred

metres further down the rail bed a frame and pile trestle has burned to the ground. The trestle is believed to have been set ablaze by the work of arsonists. This trestle is easily bypassed by using a service road that runs alongside the KVR. This does however require an extremely steep decent down (nearly 30 degrees) from the raised trail bed followed by an equally steep climb on the other side.

KM 73.2 – Manning Station

The only evidence that this station ever existed is the widened right of way and some scattered concrete pieces. The rail bed before and after Manning Station crosses Otter Creek numerous times. This stretch is extremely straight. So straight that it gives the definite illusion of going nowhere. We had an extremely interesting weather system passing over head along this stretch. Before starting we were forced to take cover from the rain and hail. After that had passed we were forced to keep up a good pace due to the fact that ahead, it was raining, and behind, it was snowing. We were stuck in the middle and did not want to be in either.

KM 84.0 – Tulameen Station

This station has a rich history. Originally the station was called Campement des Femmes, meaning Camp of the Women. Salish Indians used this flat expanse as a base camp and often left their women and children here while they went on the hunt. Later the flats became known as Otter Flats. This was originally due to its use by the white man during the Gold Rush.

Eventually, it was renamed Tulameen. Once again we met up with Anne. The original station house was built in 1914 and now serves as a private residence. Also an old red freight shed has been moved a short distance from the rail bed and is being used as storage shed.

Also found in Tulameen is an archway across the rail way access that reads ‘Tulameen Gateway’.

KM 90.5 – Coalmont Station

After a long and difficult day we finally arrived in Coalmont, our destination for the day. Coalmont is a very small community which still boasts many original buildings such as the Saloon and Hotel. About a ten minute ride from the rail bed we found Granite Creek Forestry Campsite. We spent the night here and met a high school outdoors education teacher who was travelling the KVR in the opposite direction. We swapped notes with each other on the conditions of the trail. He warned us that the next portion of the rail bed was covered in loose shale and should be carefully negotiated.

DAY THREE: Summary

Distance Traveled: 49 KM

Weather: Partly cloudy, cool to cold, bursts of showers near 13:00. Snow spotted in the distance behind us.

Start Time: 10:00

Finish Time: 18:30

Number of Travel Hours: 8.5

Total Trip Distance: 90.5 KM

Day Four

Are we there yet?

Start Time: 10:00

KM 90.5 – Coalmont Station & Granite City

Located just outside the Granite Creek Forestry campsite is the site of Granite City. This name comes from Granite Creek which joins the Tulameen River in this area. In 1885 gold was discovered in the streams and the population soon grew to about 2000 people. In 1886 Granite City was considered to be the largest city in the interior of British Columbia. Four years later the gold boom had ended and the town became deserted. Gold panning in Granite City was difficult because of a white metal of similar weight to gold. It was difficult to separate from real gold. Many years later it was discovered that this faux gold was actually platinum, with a value well exceeding that of gold. All that currently exists of Granite City are a few remains of log buildings in the campsite and one log cabin just outside the campsite.

This cabin is being restored to its original condition. A short distance away a small cairn holds a plaque that marks the location of Granite City.

KM 90.7 – Coalmont-Tulameen Road

We returned through town and once again regained access to the KVR rail bed.

KM 100.8 – Parr Tunnel

This tunnel is 147 metres long, and due to the curvature of the tunnel neither end is visible when in the middle of the tunnel. Shortly past the tunnel we came to a trail pavilion which has been built. We chose this pavilion with its wonderful view of the Tulameen River to stop and have lunch. This section of the railroad is named after the engineer who constructed the Parr Tunnel. Originally, two bridges took 1.5 kilometres along the south side of the Tulameen River. However, on January 25, 1935, an ice jam washed out one of the bridges. Repairs were not completed until February of 1935. These bridges however continued to cause problems with respect to their maintenance. This resulted in the construction of the tunnel in 1948 and 1949 which allowed 1.3 Kilometres to be relocated to the north side of the Tulameen River. You can still see the original rail bed on the far side of the river. According to trustworthy sources the original ties still lie there rotting into history.

KM 108.0 – Another Tunnel

This tunnel, located just before the city of Princeton, is 324 metres long and as straight as an arrow. Travelling through the tunnel provides the illusion that the tunnel is actually getting longer the farther you enter. While this is obviously not true it is a very overpowering feeling.

This tunnel takes the rail bed under Highway 3 just after you cross the Tulameen River on a 96 metre metal frame rail bridge.

KM 109.4 – Princeton Station

Entering Princeton you must pass through an industrial area of town. In order to discourage motor vehicles from using the rail bed concrete blocks, some as much as 5 feet tall, have been placed randomly along several hundred metres of rail bed. After the straight forward ride along the clear rail bed this was a welcome relief as we realised that we must once again ‘steer’. After passing under a gateway similar to the one in Tulameen reading “Princeton Gateway” we found Anne waiting for us. We took about 40 minutes here to rest before continuing on.

Originally Princeton was known as Vermillion Forks. Vermillion refers to the mercuric sulphide compound that produces a brilliant red pigment. In 1860, Vermillion Forks was renamed after the Prince of Wales. Hence the name Princeton. The original station can still be found. However, it has been sided with vinyl and now is home to a real estate office and to a Subway restaurant.

The next portion of our journey was long and arduous. We were tired and sore from the last four days of riding and we knew that the end was only a short ways away. To make matters worse much of this section of rail bed was covered with shale and larger sections of loose rock making the going very tough. We found ourselves stopping to rest for five minutes after each 10 or 12 minutes of riding. Progress was very slow.

KM 117.9 – Belfort Station

This station was named after the famous French garrison in the Jura Mountains that resisted the German invasion of 1870. However, once again the evidence that it ever existed is only in a widening of the right of way. This was the last time that we scheduled to meet up with Anne before the final destination of our trip.

The next portion of the rail bed consisted of a series of three large loop backs that cover many kilometres. The hardest part about these loops was that they were at a considerable incline.

KM 124.7 – Highway 40

As we were getting ready to cross Highway 40 I received a cell phone call from Anne. She told us the road access to our destination, Jura Station, was completely blocked and destroyed. After consulting our maps and guides it was decided that we would have to call an end to our trip here as the next road access after Jura Station was nearly 10 Kilometres and we did not feel that we would be capable of the extra uphill distance. Therefore, Anne returned to our location on Highway 40 and we completed our journey.

DAY FOUR: Summary

Distance Traveled: 34.2 KM

Weather: Partly clear, sunny, warm, no precipitation.

Start Time: 10:00

Finish Time: 16:30

Number of Travel Hours: 6.5

Total Trip Distance: 124.7 KM

Trip Summary

An experience to never forget

Total Distance Travelled: 124.7 Kilometres

Number of Days: 4

Number of Nights: 3

Number of hours Travelling: 28

General Weather: Cloudy with sun. Snow, rain, and hail on days 2 and 3. Cold to warm.

Overall Experience: !OUT OF THIS WORLD!

While the trip was a success there are several points that must be mentioned so that any one in the future may have an even better trip. While nothing major occurred there were a few incidents that could have been improved upon. They are as follows.

Weather

While forecasts were gathered there was no way to properly predict the weather at such a high altitude. As such we should have been slightly more prepared with a proper action plan for snow and hail. Instead we found ourselves creating plans and making decisions as the snow began to fall. While this was not detrimental to our health because we had the foresight to use a chase vehicle, it was an issue that caused us to be unable to complete the journey on the second day. However, it must also be mentioned that considering the gravity of the situation the right decisions were made without a plan in a timely matter. It takes a lot of will power to abandon the plan that you want to follow and admit that it will have to be done another time.

Personal Preparedness and Clothing

Overall everyone was prepared to a basic level both physically and mentally. However, while Jason, Tyler, and I had each participated in other long range cycle trips, Joel had never. While no major issues became apparent there were several points that should also be noted. While all attempts were made to ensure that Joel knew what the trip was going to be like in advance it was not possible for him to fully comprehend the scope and challenge of the trip without having done a proper cycle expedition before. We assumed that the many days of mountain biking meant that he was fully aware of what the exploration would be like. Also it should be noted that his lack of experience in simple matters like cooking and setting up and breaking camp meant that the rest had to work a little harder. However, Joel is definitely a better person as a result of the experience and is better prepared for any future expeditions.

He learnt the skills in the best possible way; learning by doing.

Secondly a note should be made that more than one person was not prepared from a clothing standpoint. On more than one occasion clothing had to be borrowed for sleeping, and for weather dependent times such as the rain and snow. Once again this did not have any effect on the trip or any participants, but had the potential to become a problem if the owner later needed the same clothing. The only way that I see to avoid this in the future is to have an extremely specific list of personal gear as opposed to assuming that we are all seasoned campers and know what to pack.

Route Plan

While the basic route plan was very well detailed through the use of guidebooks and maps we still encountered problems. Due to the time elapsed since the publication many roads or portions of the KVR that we planned to use were no longer accessible and alternate plans had to be made on the fly. Once again, this was not a critical point. However, it should be kept in mind that much of the KVR is on private property and is subject to change in access at the whim of the land owner. Our trip was cut short due to such changes in road access.

Other Situations

The only other situation that has not already been mentioned occurred on the third day.

Approximately 1.5 hours before we arrived in Tulameen (2.5 hours from days end) Joel started to become cold. Upon consultation with him I determined that is was due to the temperature and the fact that he had not eaten anything since shortly after lunch. While he had been hungry for some time he did not ask for food from any of our stores. Upon giving him some food and some chemical hand warmers to help re-warm him he immediately started to improve. Within minutes he was ready to go. Later I discovered that he did not know that I always carry enough food and rations to keep all participants alive in any situation for at least 24 hours. This was a case of miscommunication. It must be noted that in the future all participants must be told to never be afraid to ask for help and all must know the exact emergency measures taken. This never turned into a true emergency situation; however, if he had not appeared visibly cold it could have further developed into a case of hypothermia.

Logistics

Where is the Hot Chocolate?!

Yes, we did forget the Hot Chocolate. However, being thrifty Venturers we soon discovered that hot fruit juices work just as well. This next section will describe our route plan (including maps and diagrams), the equipment that we took, the menu, and the safety equipment available.

Equipment

We started out with a small list of things that we needed to make the exploration a success. However, it soon grew until it was quite large. Here is a list of the equipment that went with us.

Group Equipment

.. 2- tents

.. 1- two burner camp stove

.. 3- tarps

.. 1- folding table

.. 2- lamps

.. 1- propane tree (for lamp and stove)

.. 1- large propane tank

.. 4- small propane tanks

.. 1- cooler chest

.. 1- large first aid kit

.. 1- set of basic cooking utensils

.. 1- small set pots and pan

.. 1- bucket of twine

.. 1- bag of assorted ropes

.. 3- small wash tubs

.. 3- water containers (filled)

.. 1- axe

.. 1- hatchet

.. 1- container with matches, and other fire lighting equipment

.. 1- set of cleaning solutions (dish soap and hand soap)

.. !FOOD!

Personal Equipment

.. sleeping bag

.. sleeping mat

.. camp pillow

.. pairs of pants

.. pairs of soccer shorts

.. 8- t-shirts

.. 8- underwear

.. 12- socks (wool, cotton, and nylon)

.. toques

.. pairs of cotton gloves

.. pair of cycling gloves

.. helmet

.. pair running shoes

.. pair hiking boats

.. whistles

.. compass

.. phones (cell and satellite)

.. spare inner-tube

.. tool kit

.. tire pump

.. rain gear (top and bottom)

.. FRS radios

.. 700ml water bottles

.. digital camera

.. notebooks

.. guide books

.. topographical maps

.. survival kit (please section that follows for details)

.. Global Positioning System Until

.. nylon belts

.. pairs sunglasses

.. axle/chain grease

.. 10- extra batteries

.. pair of extra laces

.. warm jackets

.. fleece hoodies

.. wool blanket

.. bottle of waterless hand wash solution

.. multi-purpose tool (fancy pocket knife)

.. bottle SPF 45 sunscreen

.. dishes (plate, bowl, cup)

.. lightweight carabineers

.. 25 metre buoyant rope

.. 1- high absorbent camp t

.. magnesium block an

.. space blanket

.. flare launcher (10 flares)

.. pocket knives

.. folding saw

.. whistle

.. emergency fi

.. flashlights

.. glow sticks

.. flashing red

.. 10- hot hands (hand warmers)

.. Rations (energy bars, GORP)

.. mirror

.. mini sewing kit

.. cheap lighters

weighed approximately 20 Kilograms. All safety equipment was listed in the above lists and can easily be identified. It should be noted that with the exception of a few blisters and one small cut no emergency equipment was required. We still used the phone to communicate our position to Anne, but never in a true emergency fashion.

Menu

Friday Lunch

.. bun wiches (cream cheese or cold cuts)

.. juice boxes

.. apples and oranges

Friday Dinner

.. dehydrated soup (3 bean Chile soup)

.. buns

.. veggies & dip

.. milk

Saturday Breakfast

.. oatmeal

.. milk

.. oranges and apples

Saturday Lunch

.. bagels

.. cream cheese

.. cold cuts

.. apples and oranges

.. juice boxes

Saturday Dinner

.. chile

.. pepperoni

.. buns

.. milk or juice

Sunday Breakfast

.. egg McMuffins (english muffins, eggs, cheese, and beef cold cuts)

.. milk

.. oatmeal

Sunday Lunch

.. bun wiches (cream cheese or cold cuts)

.. juice Boxes

.. apples and Oranges

Sunday Dinner

.. baked beans with ham

.. mixed salad

.. milk

Monday Breakfast

.. pancakes and sausage

.. apples and oranges

.. milk

Monday Lunch

.. bagels

.. cream cheese

.. cold cuts

.. juice boxes

Staples (always available)

.. granola bars

.. juice boxes

.. water

.. juice crystals

.. cookies

Breakfast and dinner were always hot meals and the lunches were prepared in the morning so that we could take them with us on the trail. After we left the camp each morning we were totally self contained until we arrived at camp again that evening.

Maps

The next several pages contain maps which clearly show our route and all major points of interest. Please refer to the kilometre markings which correspond to the exploration log.

Day One

Start

KM 9.5

KM 21.7—Base

Camp Day 1 and 2

Day Two

KM 21.7 Base

Camp Day 1 and 2

KM 31.1

KM 41.5 DAY END

Days Three and Four

Base Camp

Day 1 and 2

KM 47.9

KM 57.1

KM 73.2

KM 84.0

KM 90.5

Base Camp Day 3

KM 100.8

KM 109.4

KM 117.9

KM 124.7

Journey End

History

Let us not forget

This history of the Kettle Valley Railway is too vast to include in any one book. However, I will attempt to summarise the most important portions in this report. The KVR’s history is a rich story with many twists and turns, both financially and physically.

The railway was conceived in the late 1880s as a route to allow the mines of the Kootenay District of Southern British Columbia access to the coast and Vancouver. The railway became a struggle of personalities, politics, finance and geography. More than six governments rose and fell over the issues surrounding the building of this railway. More than 100 workers died in the construction and operations of the railway. However, as remarkable as it is, no passenger ever died on the KVR.

The railway was nicknamed, McCulloch’s Wonder, after the railway’s chief engineer, Andrew McCulloch. He built this astonishing railway crosses three mountain ranges and some of the most rugged canyons on this planet. Many people have called the KVR the most difficult and expensive railway ever built.

The railway starts in the once small town of Hope, 90 miles east of Vancouver. The railway chose to take the most daring and treacherous path, one that no previous group had taken.

While all other roads and rail lines had chosen to travel north, around the mountain ranges, before continuing east, the KVR chose to go straight through the heart of the mountains.

While construction started in 1910, it was only 20% complete in 1912 due to the lack of workers, rail ties and other equipment.

Part of the reason for the slow progress was the extremely difficult terrain that the railway was forced to cross. In the mountains above Kelowna, in what is now called Myra Canyon,

McCulloch encountered an obstacle even he was taken aback by. “Never saw a railway built on any such hillside as this! Cannot even guess the cost now.” he wrote in his diary. This task was so great that in a stretch of only 5.5 miles they were forced to build 18 wooden trestles and two tunnels as well as numerous retaining walls.

Many legal battles ensued between the KVR and other rail companies for the right of way through the Coquihalla pass as all were attempting to build similar railroads. After a long period of brutal construction in the Coquihalla pass the last spike was finally driven in on July 31, 1916. At last the line was complete and officially declared open. The railway had cost a grievous amount of money to build and through the entire life of the KVR the debts racked up were never repaid.

Throughout the history of the operation of the KVR many things changed. New stations were

created, and old ones decommissioned. New services were created and disappeared before the public even knew about them. However, while they never paid off their debts, the rail line was extremely successful. The last passenger train ran in January 1964 and the final freight train arrived in Spences Bridge on May 12, 1989. Just over a year later, on June 21, 1990, the National Transportation Agency authorized Canadian Pacific to abandon the railway, and during 1991 all track, with the exception of seven miles of track near Summerland saved for a tourist railway operation, was removed. The Kettle Valley Railway became a part of history.

Andrew McCulloch won the appreciation of the KVR’s passengers through his use of Shakespearean names for his stations. These names, such as Romeo, Juliet, Othello, and Lear, created a sense of familiarity with the passengers on the trains and allowed to them to feel at home even when they were travelling through the most treacherous railway in the world.

It is unfortunate to note that many relics of the railway are disappearing faster than the company itself. Only a few years ago you could still find many rail houses and other buildings at many locations along the original path. Now only the few structures that have been designated heritage buildings can be found. This is a true tragedy. As we found during our exploration many bridges and stations have been burned to the ground, both in accidents and by arsonists. Other buildings we were told still exist but have been moved many miles to be conglomerated with other heritage buildings. In many places the only evidence that something had once existed was the widening of the right of way or a sign stating the location of a building.

A second note is that the KVR recently suffered a most grievous loss. During the second firestorm of the Okanagan Mountain Park Fire, August 2003, 12 of the wooden trestles above Kelowna were completely destroyed. All that can be found of them are some concrete anchor pilings. Two steel trestles were also badly damaged. These trestles have long been an important part of the heritage of Kelowna and the KVR as you could see so many in just five miles. They are gone now and we will never be able to truly see their wonder again.

(Webmaster note: New Trestles have been built and were completed in 2008.)

Cranbrook Community Forest in Rocky Mountain

Cranbrook Community Forest in Rocky Mountain recreation site has no Campsites but you can go to the site with a two wheel drive! Enjoy attractive Camping, Hiking, Mountain Biking, Nature Study, Picnicking opportunities.

Amenities: Tables,Toilets

Free Camping

Cranbrook Community Forest, Rocky Mountain, Cranbrook

Site Description:Interpretive forest adjacent to the City of Cranbrook. Recreation or, interpretive trail network with day use facilities and refer to the Cranbrook Community Forest brochure, available at the Cranbrook office.

Driving Directions: The main vehicle entrance to the Sylvan Lake area is adjacent to the South East Fire Centre Base at the north end of Cranbrook. Turn off the highway onto 30th Ave. N. and then immediately left onto the business frontage road. The most folksy walking entrance can be found near the Cranbrook Golf Course. Continue past the golf course on 2nd St. S. Just beyond Edgewood Dr. turn left into the gravel parking area. This gate is closed year round. A useful link for driving directions in BC: http://www.milebymile.com/main/Canada/British_Columbia/Canada_British_Columbia_road_map_travel_guides.html

Cranbrook Community Forest in Rocky Mountain Interactive Map

Christie Falls between Kelowna and Vernon - A Spectacular Okanagan Gift

It’s a Lever 2000 commercial!

Christie Falls is a spectacular gift situated  on the edge of the area know as Fintry Protected Area. Fintry Provincial Park is at the east end of the Shorts Creek canyon where it opens onto Okanagan Lake below Westside Rd. and features the very popular Shorts Creek waterfall. Thanks to Don and Norma Jean for arranging the hiking trip. This I section has a trail and is know probably because it is also a new rock climbing area. The cliffs are flat, steep with a curve inward which allow the falls to cascade over the cliff face uninterrupted before gently touching down 100 meters onto the rocks below. This trip was in August so while there could be a higher volume of water earlier in the year, at the time we were there the great height allowed the water from Christie Creek above to disperse enough so that it seemed to equal the strength of a typical shower. When John took a shower, if he had a bar of Dove soap he may have been hired for a great commercial.

Christie Falls GPS track below begins at the Tim Hortons on Hgwy 97 where our group met to start the trek. We took Westside Rd after crossing the bridge and followed Bear Creek Forest Service Road to km 13 where we went up Esperon FSR to Christie Road. Christie Rd begins about half way past Big Horn Resevoir – a large man made lake on west side of Esperon at the 28 km.

Christie FSR off of Esperon

 

After we traveled down Christie FSR for a couple km, one  of the groups tire went flat. No problem though, some kind of gunk from Canadian Tire was blasted into the tire via the air valve and then pumped up with a handy little pump plugged into the lighter and off we went again. We turned up a short logging road that came to a dead end then parked and found the trail at the end of the “cul-de-sac” of the logging road. I thought this was the second road heading north after entering Christie FSR but after looking on the satellite view via the gps track below, I am not so sure – however it is easily found if you watch the km signs on Christie road – the correct road to take is directly accross from a km sign.

Of course you can also download the track from this site via google maps and upload it to your GPS – or if you have a BlackBerry just follow the indicator until the location matches on the google maps matches the map below. One note of interest on BlackBerry map use. When I want to use Google maps on my BB, I scroll the map through the area that I want to travel so the images download when I have cell service, then when I am using my gps app on my blackberry I can switch between the app and google maps to see whatever i need to see. Sounds confusing but if you use your BB for your GPS, you need to remember to download the map images before you get out of cell service each time you go out. Just make sure you have the map layer of your choice as well as you cannot change between layers without cell service.


View Christie Falls in a larger map

A flat tire is quickly taken care of by some Canadian Tire gunk.

The Trail Head is behind the vehicle at the end of this culdesac.

View from the Christie Falls hiking trail head.

Christie Creek runs near by the trail as you walk to the top of the falls, there are two “bridges” to cross on your way. It was interesting to see the growth two years after the Terrace Mountain fire.

Christie Falls Foot Bridge – careful Linda

Christie Falls hiking trail – single track – rocky and hilly – obstacles

Growth after the Terrace Mountain Forest Fire

Christie Falls Foot Bridge – careful Linda

The top of Christie Falls

Canyon view from above Christie Falls

Almost at the Rope Trail down to Christie Falls

Christie Falls near Fintry

Christy Falls with cave behind the falls – to see the folks in the picture – click it, then click it again and zoom in – it gets really big!