Twin Lakes Hiking in the Monashee – part 1

The Kelowna Secondary Outdoor Education class was on this awesome Monashee backpacking trip in September. As for all the trips with this Outdoor Ed. team, the class was treated with a spectacular outdoor experience and excellent training.

How to get to Twin Lakes in the Monashee’s – awesome Alpine country…

Drive 22km east from Lumby on Highway 6 and turn left onto the North Fork Road turnoff. Drive to the end of North Fork Road and turn onto Severide Creek Road. Continue down this road until you come to the parking lot, which also has an outhouse and the Twin Lakes hiking trail sign. This is a 6km hike, which takes approximately one and a half hours. Use caution, this is Grizzly country.

See more pictures in Part 2 of Monashee Hiking to Twin Lakes

Wow, was the first trip of the year ever a success! We didn’t need to be told that we had record breaking weather, it was absolutely beautiful. The hike in was interesting, as always there were people stopping all over the place re-adjusting packs and ropes, complaining about how they had to carry the tent or bragging about how they didn’t have to…and then those really smart people who silently thought about how awesome their hammocks are. Nobody really knew how long the hike in would be, some people hiked totally blindly one foot in front of the other, as long as someone else was in front of them. Some people kept guessing, oh this must be half way, is that the lake there? Eventually we made it,and was the hike ever worth it! Twin lakes is a beautiful pair of lakes, set exactly where it should be for a perfect base camp. I even found a Geocache right near by that contained $20 and a pack of candies. By the looks of the log book the cache had been visited quite infrequently.

After a very long sleep the second day began with breakfast, as every day should, and a short little hike that must have been 3km, but took us all day due to the terrain, much of which looked like this: /, or even: l. Lunch was had on a nice ridge that looked like a knife edge from the right angle. The number of ladybugs under the rocks up there were unbelievable! When I was first told where we were going to have lunch, I didn’t actually believe you Mr. Walker! Someday I hope to have lunch there again. After lunch we did a quick walk/slide down to “Hot Spring Lake,” named for the hot spring in the lake…or so we were told. After some much needed rest at Hot Spring Lake we walked around a little more and up another little hill (haha) and passed under a really cool snow bridge which Molly the Beautiful Beast decided to go over. Walking under the snow bridge was definitely cool, especially after walking on another one earlier that day; you have to wonder how much snow you are really standing on sometimes. Once we got past the snow we had made pretty much a full circle and ended up where we more or less started, just above twin lakes. After that we were fortunate to have enough time, and willing people, to hike the hill to the NE of twin lakes. This was a cool hike because in the hour we spent on this hill Mr. Welder showed us some pretty cool hidden caves, (if that’s what you would call them) where several people could hide in; not great for those of us who are claustrophobic…but still really cool. At the top of this hill we rolled some very large rocks to their death, one of which Mr. Walker especially enjoyed watching fall…fall…explode. On the way back to camp we were shown where Sasquatch had been met on a previous year, a story I found much more believable than that of Hot Spring Lake.

The last day I barely remember because I was so tired, but I am sure I probably hiked off the mountain, as I am now here typing and not out gathering wood from some steep slope.

Jesse Kessler

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Nude or Prude - Halfway Hotsprings near Nakusp.

After crossing the Arrow Lakes on the Galena Bay Ferry, for free, travel towards the village of Nakusp along Highway 6 until you reach Halfway Creek which just happens to be half the way to Nakusp from Galena Bay.  Find a place to park along the FSR and grab your snowshoes and be prepared for a 11 km hike to Halfway Hotsprings.  Of course if you choose to go in summer you can drive right to the Hot Springs. View December 2012 Halfway Hotsprings pictures. (looks much more different in the snow.)

Nude or Prude

Galena Bay Free Ferry Ride

Halfway Creek is rather dry in the winter which makes it perfect for enjoying the Hot Springs

Hot water for the Hot Springs

Haphazard Hot Springs infrastructure

Infrastructure Pool of water

more Halfway pools

halfway outhouse

 

Halfway Hotsprings

Monashee Hiking to Twin Lakes - Part 2

See part 1 with the Twin Lakes directions and more pictures here.

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Monashee Alpine Hiking to Twin Lakes

Loon Lake Free Camping and Fishing

Loon Lake is one of the many lakes on the Aberdeen Plateau. Access to the lakes is from Philpot Road off of Highway 33 or Beaver Lake Road from Winfield. If accessing from Beaver Dee Lake road, follow the road past both Beaver and Dee lake resorts until you are on Aberdeen Rd, just past Dee lake, with in a few km you will find a road marked “fly fish 2 access.” This site is on a small fishing lake. Access may be rough. The site has a rustic cartop boat launch. There is only one campsite at this lake.

Here are the links to other Loon Lake rec sites in BC.

http://www.tracksandtrails.ca/2011/04/camping-at-loon-lake-in-rocky-mountain-2/

http://www.tracksandtrails.ca/2011/04/free-camping-at-loon-lake-in-rocky-mountain/

Here are a few pictures of Loon Lake in British Columbia near Kelowna.

Great to find Loon Lake nicely marked for some fishing and camping.

Loon Lake is ready for you and your belly boat.

Hike above Monashee Lake

Monashee lake is a beautiful alpine lake nestled in the Monashees just past Cherryville. This hike takes you into the heart of an area known as The Pinnacles.

To reach this alpine paradise drive east of Cherryville and follow South Forks FSR off of Hwy 6. Watch out for signs posted that will direct you to the trail head. From the trail head you will hike through a cedar forest, into an alder jungle and eventually up into the alpine. In some areas the trail is difficult to follow because the area is constantly changing from rockfall and spring run-off, watching for ribbons that mark the trail should make things easier.  From Monashee lake in the later summer you can hike up to a peak between the three tallest mountains in the Pinnacles (Mt Severide, Pinnacle Peak and Pinnacle E4). From this smaller peak the view is certainly beautiful. There are two possible routes to the peak, one is easier, and one takes you on a scenic walk along a steep ridge. Just below the peak on the other side there is even a small grassy area that could be camped at, although the area must be respected because this is a delicate alpine.

For a map of the hiking routes that we took

 

Unfortunately the batteries to the camera that was brought died shortly into the trip so I only have pictures of and just after the trailhead.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grizzly Lake

Grizzly lake is a fairly large lake accessible to 2wd vehicles and roughly only an hour from Kelowna. Grizzly lake has multiple sites along the side of the lake, all can be driven right up to. This is a convenient lake to launch small fishing boats into.

 

 

 

To access Grizzly Lake From Kelowna follow Phillpot Rd from Hwy33 past Ideal Lake. Eventually you will reach a fork where one option is Aberdeen Rd and the other option is Grizzly Lake FSR. follow Aberdeen Rd a short distance to the lake. Grizzly Lake Rd takes you on a scenic tour of the logged countryside and eventually brings you to Aberdeen lake.

Grizzly lake Island – don’t forget the Kayak!

Camp for free at this large lake - Grizzly Lake.

Who could ask for more? Blue skies and free camping!

Best Picture of the trip! ...don't you think?


View Grizzly Lake on Aberdeen Plateau in a larger map

FlyFish Lake # 1 Free Camping and flyfishing

FlyFish Lake # 1 Free Camping and flyfishing recreation site has 3 campsites and you can go to the site & enjoy marvelous camping, attractive hiking, fantastic fishing.

This is a beautiful small lily pad lined lake halfway between Kelowna and Lumby. This walk-in lake is only a couple hundred meters from the main fsr. At the road there are two tent sites with fire pits and at the lake there is a small clearing with a large fire pit. Dead wood is plentiful. Bring bug spray and your fly rod!

General directions: If coming from Kelowna Follow Beaver Lake Rd from Windfield. Take the first major right after Dee lake and drive for only a few km before finding the 2 sites and the sign “Fly Fish Lake #1 Rec Site.” Roughly 45mins from Kelowna.

While we were there the area seemed to be a rich with flora and fauna. We caught leeches and fished for the fish we saw jumping. We seemed to be competing with two loons and a large eagle who also seemed to be fishing. Relaxing by the shore was pleasant as mint was growing wild along the water.

See FlyFish # 2 post  (has map you can zoom in to see the lake as well)

FlyFish Lake # 1 Free Camping and flyfishing Interactive Map

Online Camping/Hiking/Canoeing/Fishing/Boating/Biking/Hunting and Clothing Equipment Stores are available here:

Free Camping, Hiking, Outdoor Equipment, Clothing at TracksAndTrails.ca Adventures Online Store

Camping Equipment Online Shop USA stores

Crayfish trapping in the Okanagan - Bullman lake

Well under an hour from central Rutland and only 15km from where Postill Lake FSR becomes dirt is a lovely fair sized lake called Bullman or Moore lake. This stocked lake receives light traffic and is great for fishing both large and small rainbow trout. This lake has a few fire pits and a great spot for launching canoes and small fishing boats.

 

To access this lake take the second major left turn off of Postill Lake Rd. This Turn is around the 11 or 12 km marking. The road will be marked with a yellow sign; “Bullman” follow this road straight to the lake! This drive is not recommended for low clearance vehicles.

 

Last time I was at Bullman lake I tried setting a crayfish trap made from a tomato plant holder and baited with a fish head. However, after leaving the trap overnight I had no luck and my bait was still there. Does anyone have any advice or experience crayfish trapping in the Okanagan?

 

Biking Mt. Hayman in March

See Clayton’s Mt. Hayman trip info

See the owner of Mount Hayman Lake info

Date: March 26, 2009

Location: Mt. Hayman

Conditions: Very snowy at the top (up to 1.5 feet), muddy at the bottom west of the mountain and totally dry at the bottom south of the mountain.

Length of trip: 1.5 hours – 2 hours

Description: after traveling along Bartley road, passing the parking lot most people park at to hike up the mountain, passing the cattle guard by several hundred meters and starting at a relatively well traveled (4×4) road on the west side of the mountain I biked up the 4×4 road towards Hayman lake. At first biking was relatively easy going although muddy, but as the snow became deeper with elevation gain it became impossible to continue biking and much of the ascent became pushing or carrying my bike. After nearly reaching the lake I turned back to bike down the paths leading down the south side of the mountain to the parking lot. Downhill biking in snowy conditions sucks. I met two guys on quads on the way down; they thought I was crazy, especially due to my shorts and t-shirt which contrasted nicely to the snowy background. All in all, I thoroughly enjoyed the ride.

Recommendations: The loop I took is very nice for biking if you plan to visit Hayman Lake via bike as the road up to the lake on the west of the mountain is considerably less steep then the trails coming up from the parking lot. Also, if you plan to do this trip in March, hiking would be the preferred mode of travel, with snowshoes to wear when you get to the top. Bringing cookies is a must.

Angel Springs Trail

A 5.7 km hike on Kelowna’s Southern slopes. (round trip)

1. If you have been on the Angel Springs trail before:
If you have been on the Angel Springs trail before; looking for these warm-springs, but having no clue what to expect, the Angel Springs is just a section of KLO creek where hydrothermal activity heats the water to 29 degrees Celcius at the warmest. The springs do not occur in one specific area but several parts of the creek in the area of the trail that are warmed by seeps of hot water from inside the earth. Water from the springs is found in a small ravine and is identified by its bright orange colour. The colour of the water comes from algal growth and some iron-bearing minerals.

2. If you have never been on the trail, but would like to visit the springs:

This is a very nice hike, and is not too terribly long, although wet conditions due to run off in the spring can make the hike very long and slightly unenjoyable. To get to the springs you follow June Springs Rd untill it changes into a dirt road, Little White Forest Service Road, follow this until you get to a flat area where you could park, this is where the trail starts. (This parking area also provided a place for a little bit of pellet gun target practice due to a nice embankment that stops all pellets.) The cordinates of the trail head are:
49 (degrees) 48’31.01’’N
119 (degrees) 22’28.69’’W
and the elevation is approximately 3129 feet.

Thanks to Rob who commented on this post, I was corrected and have found this information on the Myra-Bellevue Provincial Park website (Angel Springs Trail is in the park):

Hunting

Myra-Bellevue is open to hunting. Check the British Columbia Hunting and Trapping Regulations synopsis for further details.
Note: There is a large population base using the Crawford Trails network, and hunters are urged to be cautious when hunting in this location.

I believe you can follow the trail as a loop. Have fun!

The following trail pictures are old with a cheap camera – send me yours after you complete the hike!

Camping

Angel Springs Trail Head – On Little White FSR – near 1 km mark.

At the first fork, go upwards (right) and follow the trail and signs. These pictures were taken in the spring when there was lots of water on the trails in Kelowna. The trail is pretty wide at first then narrows down as it follows the Myra Canyon just outside of Kelowna.

 

Free Camping

Take the correct path in the Angel Springs Trail Fork.

 

Angel Springs Trail

Angel Springs Trail

 

Hiking

Angel Springs Trail Sign

 

Hiking

Angel Springs Area near the KVR

 

Free Hiking

Cedar Trees by Angel Springs

 

free camping

Angel Springs Rock

At the 1 km sign post on Little White Forest Service Road there is a nice parking area with lots of banks that work well for pellet gun and sling shot practice.

Aberdeen Lake

Aberdeen Lake is one of the most northern lakes on the Aberdeen plateau. Buck Hills Rd wraps around the North side of the lake where there is access to many individual free private camp sites. If you know you are at the lake and you see a road heading towards it, chances are it leads to a parking site with a fire pit.

The lake is accessible by 2wd From either Phillpot Rd, Beaver Dee Rd or Lumby.

Aberdeen Lake

camp site near aberdeen lake

Tadpoles for the children to discover.

tadpoles galore

aberdeen lake

Plenty of parking...ok ok I just like my Ford Ranger.

Another gorgeous free campsite.

Aberdeen Lake